The Southeast Asian Treasure Connection

YAMASHITA'S / WW2 TREASURE => Post your MAP here => Topic started by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 08:50:28 PM

Title: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 08:50:28 PM

Colonial Imperial Japanese Government Geodetic Survey,(TRIANGULATION to Cadastral)      Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Philippines Treasure Hunting put in perspective

Prelude

For so long time since TSEATC's existence much have been written, much has been discussed about Japanese treasure maps and Janner's  Japanese Maps and how to read them.., is the only thread (in my view) that talks about Japanese Maps, merits intellectual and educational appreciation.

This topic that i will be posting will try to put Japanese maps discussion into proper perspective and connect it in context to Treasure Hunting in general and treasure hunting in Philippines specifically.

It is perceived that this is only the stimulus for us who are in the hobby to possibly connect all the dots, after all, what we have learned here in TSEATC, though i can only try so much but i foresee more beautiful contributions from the select few members.

For this said topic to successfully deliver its content, though this may not be complete as we can predict, (since we can only have final conclusion if there is that one brave member who successfully recovers treasure who will testify and fill the missing links of our understanding about this seemingly "mysterious" treasure hunting quest), a thorough and organized understanding and perspective could somehow put more confidence in ourselves like a true seeker and later custodian of the real knowledge.

Before we begin, i enjoin the Admin TW, to please limit opportunities of those who are always in jest of hijacking a good thread, those who would not dare sweat to organize a good presentation but quick to disrupt and sow chaos.

To the select few, i enjoin you to help me put this one, like a booklet presentation and to those nuisance, please refrain, this does not concern you, instead my utmost concern are those members who truly seeks learning..

Again it is acknowledged, that this might not be complete and exhaustive, but i can only do so much, to start something to imbibe organization, to put our thoughts & understandings about Treasure Hunting into proper perspective.

Later from good contributions of those select few, we can hopefully compile a "handbook" but not a cookbook......

I am not a know it all man as someone from here have accused one member, but i'm really in constant quest for true knowledge and learning.
Thank you very much and it will be coming...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 10:31:32 PM
I would like to quote a friend by saying this, "A Geodetic Engineer is the man given his geodetic experience to unravel , if he only had the start points and scale”

To put it in proper perspective, I believe it is this way, Treasure hunting is a combination of applications of; (This topic also incorporates discussion about #'s 2, 3 & 4 below)

1.Yes -it’s GEODETIC ENGINEERING!

-no Maps has been created if the land was not applied GEODESY
-it’s about earliest Japanese survey, TRIANGULATION and not Isometric

To put it in context; Let's talk about Survey lines as "treasure grids"/ "Treasure signs"

2. It’s something about ASTRONOMICAL/ASTROLOGICAL observations

-it’s about CONSTELLATIONS: Plotting and connecting the missing points
-something about GEOMANCY

To put it in context; Let's talk about constellation pattern as treasure placement pattern

3. It's something  about  SUNDIAL---using Sundial as a compass

4. Basic concepts of Style of Decoding


First we will tackle about Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 10:56:45 PM
Basically. just what is Geodetic Engineering?

General practice of Geodetic Engineering

The practice of Geodetic Engineering is a professional and organized act of gathering physical data on the surface of the earth with the use of precision instruments. It is also the scientific and methodical processing of these data and presenting them on graphs, plans, maps, charts or documents. It shall embrace, but is not limited to, the following activities:

Professional Geodetic Engineering services with the use of surveying and mapping equipment such as graduated rods, measuring tapes, transits, levels, theodolites, fathometers/echosounders, electronic distance meters, global positioning systems, stereoplotters and all other instruments that are used to determine metes and bounds of lands positions of points on the surface of the earth, water depths, underwater configuration, ground elevation, gravity, isostasy, crustal movements and the size and shape of the earth, and other instruments used for construction survey, and those instruments used to guide the installation of large industrial equipment and machineries;
Horizontal and vertical control surveys and political boundary surveys;
Land surveys to determine their metes and bounds and prepare the plans thereof for titling and for other purposes;
Subdivision, consolidation and/or consolidation-subdivision of titled properties;
Submission of survey plans of subdivided, consolidated and/or consolidated-subdivision titled properties to the government agencies concerned; hereafter, such plans on surveyed titled properties submitted by geodetic engineers shall not be subject to verification and approval;
Preparation and making of sketch, lot and location plans;
Conduction of engineering surveys and the technical preparation of engineering survey plans such as topographic, hydrographic, tidal, profile, cross-section, construction and boundary surveys;
Parcellary surveys of lands traversed by infrastructure projects; and the preparation of subdivision plans;
Conduction of gravimetric and photogrammetric survey and the technical preparation of such survey plans;
Survey and mapping works such as the preparation of geographic and/or land information systems;
Survey to determine and establish line and grade for the construction of buildings and other structures and its attachments;
Construction of as-staked and as-built surveys for infrastructures;
Conduction of mineral and mining surveys;
Installation of machineries requiring the use of precision instruments;
Engagement in the transfer of the knowledge and technology of geodetic engineering in any institution of learning;


(We are a family of Engineers, my mom was a Civil Engineer (the first woman graduate of the University of Mindanao), my pops a Geodetic Engineer as well as my two brothers, the eldest holding both Civil and Geodetic licenses and the youngest a Geodetic.
I'm the odd.
I could have been a Geodetic Engineer too if i was not exposed to it too soon then, i was too young then, accompanied my pops in his field works, too young then to be easily disillusioned and have not appreciated the beauty of it all.
I was more inclined on the medical sciences but i dare touch the subject of Geodesy since i have many references, the very persons I've mentioned
)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on February 26, 2013, 11:04:40 PM
Good stuff! Keep it coming, please...
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 11:26:17 PM
Map making was everywhere at the heart of the colonial Japanese Empire.

Documents proved, Japan early on prioritized mastery of the highest standards of cartography in the colonies and dependencies from Hokkaido and Okinawa to Taiwan, Korea and Manchukuo includes all colonized nations Philippines not exempted.

Not only did precise maps provide a means for heightening Japanese control, but the very process of map making established the Japanese colonial presence throughout the land.

Cartography also provided the basis for establishing land ownership rights, a process that frequently resulted in the dispossession of lands from cultivators and the concentration of ownership rights in Japanese hands.

Aside from their soldier/warriors the Japanese Imperial Government has platoons of Geodetic Engineers and cartographers (see figures 1, 2 & 3)

Figure 1. Employees of the Land Survey Bureau of the Imperial Japanese Government (Cartographers) hard at work.

Figure 2. A surveying party gearing up for a day of fieldwork.

Figure 3. A Japanese digging party guided by the principles of Geodetic Engineering --Big proof that Engineering  was applied in almost, if not all, in the hiding of the Golden Lily Treasure!
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 26, 2013, 11:51:30 PM

Some notable Colonial Japanese Engineers:

Terao Hisashi (1855–1923),

One of Japan’s preeminent astronomers and then chairman of its Imperial Geodetic Committee.

As the first director of the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory, the first dean of the Tokyo College of Science, and the,
 chief executive responsible for the development of land-surveying techniques in Japan, Terao knew better than anyone the credence that the geodetic sciences lent to Japan’s status as a first-rank nation (itto koku), one entitled to its colonies.



Admin now we're digging ;) ;) ;),
but i'll come back tomorrow, so tired after travelling on my motorcycle almost all day just checking on the site that needs GPR scanning...more by tomorrow..., sign off for now..
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 12:14:40 AM
Before i sleep here's something to quote;

History records many foolish notions regarding the shape of the
earth.
Although it is stated that Pythagoras and Thales taught that
the earth is spherical, their teaching was without avail, as for nine
centuries the shape of the earth was the subject of all kinds of
theories.…

The triangulation and the astronomic observations.…
made by Geodetic Surveys furnish the most valuable data for the
determination of the figure of the earth that have been contributed
by any one nation.

Each civilized nation
maintains an organization for similar purposes.


—Edward Richard Cary, Geodetic Surveying, 1916 (emphasis added)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 09:22:11 AM
Most widely held works by Hisashi Terao

On the longitude of the Tōkyō Astronomical Observatory by Hisashi Terao ( Book )

1 edition published in 1894 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Observations of comet e 1888 by Hisashi Terao ( Book )

2 editions published in 1889 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Report on the total eclipse of the sun observed at Jeur, in western India on January 22, 1898 by Hisashi Terao ( Book )

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 11:09:06 AM

Another notable one;

Tanetaro Megata (1853‐1926)

High officer in the Ministry of Finance
He conducted the Jioshi Chousa 地押調査
to prepare Kosei Zu 更正図 and

realized the necessity of
the introduction of modern
cartography, especially
triangulation.


Baron Megata Tanetarō 目賀田種太郎 , sometimes (mistakenly?) referred to as Megata / Mekata Jutarō, was one of the first Japanese students at Harvard university, and one of the founders (together with Sōma Nagatane 相馬 永胤, Tajiri Inajirō 田尻 稲次郎, and Komai Shigetada 駒井 重格) of Senshū University.

For the Histor¥-project, he must primarily be remembered as one of the few 'money doctors' in the official and semi-official colonies of the Japanese empire before 1945. As an 'assistant' to the Korean government after the Russo Japanese war, he assumed full authority over Korea's financial administration, and brought Korean currency under the Japanese monetary system - a first instant of the establishment of a yen-based gold-exchange standard 円為替本位制.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 11:18:11 AM

Embedded within military units, engineering projects, and colonial governments, these surveyors firmly established themselves as vigorous contributors to Japan’s imperial project.


Like railroads, telegraphs, and guns, maps were tools of empire Indispensable to governance, surveillance, resource extraction, and countless other imperial initiatives, maps formed the lifeblood of the day-to-day operations of the colonial state.

But the impetus behind colonial cartography was more than simply utilitarian, for, as a growing number of scholars have shown, the process of surveying was as important as the product.

The survey, after all, made for good science. And science, pregnant as it was with notions of civilization, development, and material progress, sat squarely at the heart of the imperial project.

Statistics, blueprints, ethnographies: all formed building blocks upon which Japan’s civilizing mission would be constructed. Maps were no different. Cloaked in the mantle of scientific precision, the triangulation survey showcased Japan’s superior methods.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 11:24:36 AM
please note the line,

maps were tools of empire Indispensable to governance, surveillance,* resource extraction, and countless other imperial initiatives, maps formed the lifeblood of the day-to-day operations of the colonial state.

*Resource extraction can either be natural resources and the ancient treasures owned by the colonized nations----another proof that there is indeed systematic looting of resources. This is a red area now we're touching.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 11:31:05 AM
as well as this line,

Statistics, blueprints, ethnographies: all formed building blocks upon which Japan’s civilizing mission would be constructed. Maps were no different. Cloaked in the mantle of scientific precision, the *triangulation survey showcased Japan’s superior methods.

*It never ever said it is Isometric Survey, from where in the world does NS got this term in context to treasure hunting? my rods says might be from a rhyme of his first name?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 12:17:58 PM


FM DJ's says when taking a break, I'll be back right after this important messages from our sponsors since we are not on radio, i say, I'll be back after taking lunch, watch out and more will be flowing out...... BV
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 12:37:38 PM

From the cartographic point of view, it is remarkable that these colonial governments produced
topographical maps in the same manner by scaling down the cadastral maps prepared
in advance. The purpose of this presentation is to trace the development process of this
efficient map making, surveying the discernment of the planners.

During the Land Tax Reform (1873-1881), most of the cadastral maps were not
prepared with modern surveying technique in mainland Japan. Although the Ministry
of Finance tried to remake the cadastral maps since 1889 for the grasp of accurate size
of the taxable lands, complete survey with plane table was carried out only in limited
prefectures.

Learning from this experience, Tanetaro Megata (1853-1926), the high
officer of the Ministry of Finance, promoted the application of modern surveying
technique including
triangulation in the land survey of Okinawa Prefecture and lead
the officers of colonial governments to extend this manner to the newly acquired
territories.



Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 01:07:31 PM

To shed light on the methods, tools, bodies, and rhetoric employed by the Japanese state in its effort to produce cartographic knowledge of its colonies, an analysis proceeds in four phases,

First, with a broad overview of the planning process undertaken by the Provisional Land Survey Bureau (Rinji tochi chosa kyoku; hereafter Land Survey Bureau).

This overview provides a rough sketch of the triangulation survey as it fits within the larger cadastral survey project.
 
Second, the methods and tools employed by the surveyors, and traces in broad strokes the progress of the survey from its commencement to its closing.

A third section explores the physical construction of the maps,

while the concluding section considers the limitations and lacunae of these maps and, more generally, the relationship between mapping, knowledge, and power in the colonial context.

For the government-general, the land survey was thus the key to unleashing the productive power and standardized maps—those that fashioned order out of perceived chaos.



Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on February 27, 2013, 01:09:57 PM
I would surmise that not many of the so called members will read this,
 far to "In Depth" for them to take in. How ever there is a few that will and they will benefit from this.
 Good reading and leading to a finale i assume...?? ;)

(i still have my "L1A1" Theodolite too) :)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 01:11:51 PM
To shed light on the methods, tools, bodies, and rhetoric employed by the Japanese state in its effort to produce cartographic knowledge of its colonies, an analysis proceeds in four phases,

beginning with a broad overview of the planning process undertaken by the Provisional Land Survey Bureau (Rinji tochi chosa kyoku; hereafter Land Survey Bureau)

This overview provides a rough sketch of the triangulation survey as it fits within the larger cadastral survey project.

Second, the article describes the methods and tools employed by the surveyors, and traces in broad strokes the progress of the survey from its commencement to its closing.
A third section explores the physical construction of the maps,
 
while the concluding section considers the limitations and lacunae of these maps and, more generally, the relationship between mapping, knowledge, and power in the colonial context.

For the government-general, the land survey was thus the key to unleashing the productive power and standardized maps—those that fashioned order out of perceived chaos.


Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 01:17:12 PM
oppss sorry double posting....

Yes Janner, we'll try to reach finale... ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: t_hunter44 on February 27, 2013, 01:45:59 PM
as well as this line,

Statistics, blueprints, ethnographies: all formed building blocks upon which Japan’s civilizing mission would be constructed. Maps were no different. Cloaked in the mantle of scientific precision, the *triangulation survey showcased Japan’s superior methods.

*It never ever said it is Isometric Survey, from where in the world does NS got this term in context to treasure hunting? my rods says might be from a rhyme of his first name?
      TRIANGULATION was  supposed to be the proper word but NS like to use fancy or more technical words so he used Isometrics not knowing that some of us has had Engineering Drawing 101 and Isometric Drawing was a part of it. Three Dimensional Object and one can project the Top View, Side View and Back View. Well, he paid for his mistake as a lot of Flak was thrown his way. Glad to see that no one is pursuing the Topic about Isometrics as it was a Misnomer anyway, not even him. There is no point in rubbing salt to old wounds, let it lay.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 02:49:06 PM

yeah it's a misnomer but somehow it's also his superimposition of his Isometric plates on every maps presented to him, to fit his own interpretations and "solutions".

It's like a fit-any-maps "solution"

But ok whatever we should lay it down now....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:02:28 PM
Sub-categories of the major classes provide more insight into the various fields of surveying as follows:

·   Property surveys determine boundary lines, property corners, rights-of-way provide data necessary for the preparation of land sub-divisions.

·    Cadastral surveys are executed by the Federal Government in connection with the disposal of vast areas of land known as the public domain.

·    Route surveys are necessary for the design and construction of various engineering projects such as roads, railways, pipelines, canals and powerlines.

·    Industrial surveys, or optical metrology, are used in the aircraft and other industries where very accurate dimensional layouts are required.

·   Topographic surveys are performed to gather data necessary to prepare topographic maps. These are multicolour contour maps portraying the terrain; and rivers; highways, railways, bridges and other man-made features.

·    Hydrographic surveys map the shorelines of bodies of water; chart the bottom of streams, lakes, harbours and coastal waters; measure the flow of rivers; and assess other factors affecting navigation and water resources. The sounding of depths by radar is involved in this type of survey.

·   Mine surveys determine the position of underground works such as tunnels and shafts, the position of surface structures and the surface boundaries.

·    Aerial surveys use photogrammetry [/b]to produce a mosaic of matched vertical photographs, oblique views of landscape and topographic maps drawn from the photographs.

·    Construction surveys fix elevations, horizontal positions and dimensions for construction projects.

·    Control surveys provide basic horizontal and vertical position data. These are called datum. For most surveying work the vertical position of points in terms of height above a curved reference surface is mean sea level.

Surveying Techniques

1. Triangulation

2. Trilateration

3. Traverse

4. Leveling

5. Radiation
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:12:18 PM
TRIANGULATION :

 the horizontal control in GEODETIC SURVEY is kept by precise traverse or triangulation.
"The system consist of a number of connected triangles in which the length of one side called "base line" and angles (azumiths) are measured precisely.As by knowing length of one side and all the three angles,the other sides can be known easily."

The apex of each triangle is called "TRIANGULATION STATION" and the whole system is known as "TRIANGULATION SYSTEM".

Image 1

Triangulation

Triangulation consists of a series of connected triangles which adjoin or overlap each other, angles being measured from determined fixed stations. Triangulation reduces the number of measures that need to be taped and for this reason is often a preferred method of survey. A known base-line measurement is required. Three examples of triangulation systems are shown below.
 
A single chain of triangles is a rapid and economical system for covering a narrow strip of land. A chain of quadrilaterals is more accurate with checks being made by various combinations of angles and sides as the survey proceeds. Larger areas use a central point arrangement. A point to note is that all angles should be more than 20°. Angles less than 20° are not considered valid for fixing position. They introduce inaccuracies. This is much the same in navigation where a fix by two bearings requires an angle of intersection of approximately 90°, and for three bearings approximately 60°. Angles less than 30° are not acceptable.
 Image 2
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:23:52 PM

For the government-general, during colonial Japan times, (this one specifically in colonized Korea)

 
The land survey was thus the key to unleashing the productive power and standardized maps—those that fashioned order out of perceived chaos.

No single individual contributed to the day-to-day management of the cadastral survey more energetically than Tawara Magoichi (1869–1944), the career bureaucrat appointed vice president of the Temporary Land Survey Bureau in 1910 and later the director of its operations.

Tawara was soon joined by a cadre of surveying experts from Japan’s Land Survey Department (Rikuchi Sokuryobu), many of whom had cut their teeth mapping other parts of the Japanese empire. According to the official account, these surveyors “brought years of experience” (tanen shigyo no keiken o yu shi) and “progressive” surveying techniques (saishinpo seru mono) with them.

A small group of Korean surveyors, many of whom were involved in the ex-Korean government’s Kwangmu land survey (1898–1903), were also folded into the operation, as were fragments of the organizational and operational infrastructure of this earlier surveying enterprise. (Gragert 1994).

Although secondary to the cadastral process, the triangulation survey was nevertheless a vital part of the work of the Land Survey Bureau. Without maps fixed to a grid of longitudinal and latitudinal coordinates, Japan’s efforts would remain detached from the geodetic grid of the international system, yielding maps not only of questionable accuracy but also utterly unimpressive by international standards.

An abstract political goal, the process of triangulation provided the means to, quite literally, do just that. On a more practical level, the triangulation survey also provided the broader picture for surveyors and administrators alike: the base layer of spatial measurements against which more specific calculations (such as the cadastre) could be referenced.
 
“Based on the process of triangulation,” stated a report on the triangulation process, “the survey can schematically render land form and composition,” making it possible for these surveyors to enhance the cadastral process and reduce error considerably.

Both projects, in other words, were entwined: while cadastral investigators worked their way systematically from hamlet to hamlet and property to property, demarcating the boundaries and valuation of fields along the way, the geodetic survey section carried out a painstaking series of measurements to enable the consolidation of these individual plots onto one systematic spatial grid.

The early institutional composition of the Temporary Land Survey Bureau nicely reflects these twin cartographic imperatives. As of 1911, the bureau was comprised of 835 individuals of which 678 were engaged chiefly in land surveying: one as the chief surveyor, ten as inspectors, four as expert surveyors, and 661 as assistants (Unno 1997, 66).

It consisted of four primary sections: a general affairs section, which oversaw the political and administrative work of the survey; an investigation section, which conducted cadastral fieldwork; a survey section, which was charged with the production of maps through a variety of methods; and the land survey detached offices, which essentially served as local branch offices and data processing centers for the entire enterprise, A 1911 government-general report describes the division of labor as follows: “While the investigation section principally deals with investigating matters concerning ownership, location, boundaries, and also the compilation of reports of investigations, register books, etc., the survey section is charged with carrying out surveys by primary triangulation, secondary triangulation, plat survey and other measurements of lands, and with compiling maps of the districts surveyed” (GGK 1911, 42).

The Land Survey Bureau had also by this point established a small number of training schools where it undertook the recruitment and training of Korean and Japanese surveyors who would contribute to the survey in myriad ways.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:32:52 PM
The Surveyor’s Fieldwork

To monitor the planning, commencement, and implementation of the land survey:
….the first step in the sequence of the survey is the establishment of signal stations between two areas in order to establish baselines (honsen) that will connect with….signal stations already established in the vicinity.

 Surveyors, who number approximately 160, will break into twenty smaller parties, five of which will oversee the preparation and collection of land registers while the other fifteen, comprised of roughly 100 members, will undertake a detailed investigation (shosai no chosa) of these land plots.

Official documents on the movements of the triangulation surveyors are fragmentary, but a patchwork of government-general reports and the research of Japanese and Korean scholars provides a rough sketch of their earliest activities.
 
One of the first actions of the triangulation survey was to establish a geodetic linkage between Korea and Japan by way of Tsushima, an island that sat squarely between the peninsula and the archipelago. Stated a government-general report from 1910:

In order to connect the geodetic triangulation of Japan proper with that of Korea, based upon the selection of principal points of triangulation in Tsushima island, Japan proper, the longitude and latitude of Zetsuyei (Chyolyong) island (near Fusan) and Kyosai (Kö-jyö) island (near Masan) in the extreme South of the Peninsula, and the distances between the two islands were surveyed.

Dryly technical though, this statement might sound, it is hard to overstate its importance. As one of the first measurements taken by the surveyors, this geodetic linkage marked a critical step in Japan’s effort to orient Korean space to the same spatial matrix as the Japanese homeland, and thus into alignment with Japan’s own cartographic conventions.

So it was that the former trading post of Tsushima became a cartographic linchpin of the Japanese empire.

Note: This is my proof that somehow, all, GEODETIC MEASUREMENTS & the corresponding MAPPING here in the Philippines were also subsequently done to establish a GEODETIC LINKAGE BETWEEN PHILIPPINES AND JAPAN, to orient Philippines space to the same spatial matrix as the Japanese homeland, and thus into alignment with Japan’s own cartographic conventions. 
 
---Thus, In this hobby of ours EAST pointings should always be watched out.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:45:10 PM
As was standard practice, the lion’s share of the surveyors’ earliest efforts were devoted to two things: reconnaissance surveys and the construction of the baselines for the triangulation survey

Essentially imaginary lines of measurement strung across a series of elevated points, these baselines formed the spine (or “primary system”) of the survey to which all other measurements would refer.

The construction of a baseline was no easy task. Climbing a peak and establishing an unimpeded line of sight (which sometimes meant felling trees that stood in the way) demanded tremendous patience and physical strength.
 
Particularly painstaking was the erection of observation stations, some of which were massive in scale, on hilltops and mountain peaks so that surveyors could measure, using a theodolite, the distance from signal station to signal station, a string of which would form a baseline (see image below).

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:51:02 PM
(This is in Korea)

The baselines constructed by Japanese surveyors ranged from two thousand to forty-six-hundred meters in length, and were constructed in most cases along the spine of Korea’s many mountain ranges.
 
Initially, surveyors divided the peninsula into fifteen triangulation nets: subdivisions of the peninsula, determined by its natural topography, that parceled out the triangulation process into smaller, locally contained units, all of which would eventually be aligned once enough data was collected.

By the end of 1910, the surveyors had successfully constructed six baselines. By March of the following year they had established an “aggregate operative zone” of nearly seven thousand square ri in area and brought the number of baselines up to ten, which then cut through North and South Kyongsang, Ch’ungch’ong, South Cholla, and North and South P’yongan Provinces.

 Taken together, these baselines amounted to 11,327 meters in length (GGK 1914, 21). By 1913, primary surveys were under way in every province in Korea, and by some official estimates the primary triangulation survey would be completed by 1914 (GGK 1915, 10).
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 03:56:29 PM



So this is it, TRIANGULATION NETS


parceled out triangulation process into smaller, locally contained units
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 04:14:55 PM

Hey Janner & T Hunter, can we now trace how to begin creating a JAPANESE TREASURE MAP? based on Triangulation?

I believe so....

From one triangulation net, it can be....or  from two nets or perhaps, combinations?...yeah really, it can be....

Let us see, lets combine and this image now pops up!!!

A visualization of a typical combined triangulation nets in one possible area, also a possible hiding place of one elusive treasure trover.

Note the multiple scales and systems of measurements.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 04:26:00 PM

It goes without saying that the process described above was heavy on computation.

Indeed, whatever the sophistication of the tools and techniques employed by the surveyors, their maps were only as good as the trigonometric computations made by the mapmaker, which were nothing if not voluminous.

The principal challenge lay in translating data points into a map projection.

okay it's our call now, imagine yourself as the Imperial Japanese Officer Treasure Burial Planner,
Let's put ourselves on their shoes, let's try to have same mindsets and frequency of thinking....

We now have baselines.......

Starting point of understanding....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 04:36:40 PM
 
NEXT,

To put it in context; Let's talk about Survey lines as "treasure grids"/ "Treasure signs"
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 05:20:27 PM

MAP OF JAPAN's SOUTH PACIFIC MANDATE


Note: This is my proof that somehow, all, GEODETIC MEASUREMENTS & the corresponding MAPPING here in the Philippines were also subsequently done to establish a GEODETIC LINKAGE BETWEEN PHILIPPINES AND JAPAN, to orient Philippines space to the same spatial matrix as the Japanese homeland, and thus into alignment with Japan’s own cartographic conventions. 
 
---Thus, In this hobby of ours EAST pointings should always be watched out.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 06:07:51 PM
 
Survey lines as "treasure grids"/ "Treasure signs"


We have touched the topics of surveying, especially the triangulation technique, map making, and maps. We definitely have arrived to put it into context to our hobby, Treasure Hunting, specifically here in the Philippines.
It is believed that the number one reason for us to fail in locating a treasure is due to the lack of exact and truthful information.

There are the THAPI and LUZVIMINDA codes on the subject of treasure signs and symbols, and some of us here have been pretty creative in their "solutions" to these treasure markers. And it is one of these "creative solutions" that this emphasis was made, hoping to set the record straight before anyone tries to apply this solution to their own treasure site.

The "solution" that will be discussed has to do with survey lines, or, to put it, "treasure grids."

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 06:15:02 PM

It is very true that surveying was an essential part in the making of a treasure map.

Whether we are talking about an Imperial Japanese Golden Lily map, surveying was needed to help ensure that the treasure could be relocated.

Note: That’s the first thing we do together with my Father, When we subdivide lots here, we need to relocate one “mother” land area.

By following the details on map, we can relocate lost monuments and or locate the exact old position of lost or moved monuments.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 06:20:44 PM

Understandably, this act of surveying at a treasure site was "backed up" with treasure signs and symbols.

These signs and symbols are just as important as the survey lines, since it was through these signs that we would be able to confirm that we were, indeed, on the correct path to the treasure.

The reason for this "confirmation" process is simple, there are several "false trails" on EVERY treasure map, and if we were to follow one of these false trails, then we would need to know what we did wrong as well as how to correct our mistake and get back on the right track.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 06:25:38 PM

The reason we went into the survey design is because treasure map  tells us that we must do this in order to find the treasure.

The only problem is, the part of the map that tells us to do all of this surveying is, without a doubt, a false trail.

It is a trail designed to mislead us, and there, we will be lost, or, at least we will be far away from the exact position and location of treasure.

Now, surveying IS a very vital part in the CREATION of a treasure map,

and, here is how it works.....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 07:22:53 PM
Note:

Before we move much further, i would like to emphasize, that sometime in my humble beginnings i did not know these things i am talking about to you now.

These are all gathered through proper diligence and actual field operations experiences, most of these are compounded learning, hence, least i'll be accused of plagiarism, i give due credits where credits is due especially on this particular topic---Survey lines as "treasure grids"/ "Treasure signs"
 
The words are so perfect for the emphasis sake of it, that i chose not to alter some sentences and paragraphs...I just added my own emphasis based on true experience.

My role here is to connect Imperial Japanese Surveying technique to Philippine treasure hunting since my sources on these topic, brought emphasis only to Jesuits, Templars and KGC's treasure, i am obligated to connect it specifically to Philippine settings...

Mabuhay!!!
I give due credits to both Rangler and to his mentor Diggi'n and thanks for sharing...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 07:56:47 PM

When making a treasure map, there IS ALWAYS a beginning point given on the map. This beginning (A point) is nowhere near the treasures location (the Z point, the treasures location). So, what happens is that we need to know where to go from the A point, which includes the distances and directions needed for each pace of the way.

Getting to this A point is not complicated, we simply make our way to this point in whatever way that we can.

From here on, out is where we want to pay particular attention because EVERY instruction given on the treasure map from here on out is given in COMPASS DEGREES and EXACT MEASUREMENTS.

And folks, this is exactly how surveying pertains to treasure maps.

 The surveying, in other words, was DONE ONLY ONCE, and that was at the creation of the treasure map that some are holding.
 
After the creation of the map, every instruction needed to relocate the treasure room was set forth in compass degrees and exact measurements, and there is none bit of surveying needed in order to relocate a treasure room

Now, back at the A point, This first instruction from the A point is ALWAYS quite a distance away. Sometimes it's several hundred feet, sometimes it's a mile or two or three or four, etc, etc, etc,. The point is this, we really don't want to try to measure this first distance given.
We can if we want, but I guarantee you, it's a waste of time.
 
All we need to do is this, MAKE SURE  TO HAVE THE CORRECT COMPASS DEGREE as well as some idea of the distance.

Then just start walking in the compass direction given. When we have gone the proper distance, we will find a SIGN OR A SYMBOL, maybe even a large boulder monument, either way a sign will be found that tells us that we are to stop at this point (at that sign or symbol), and that FROM THIS POINT WE MAKE ANOTHER CHANGE IN DIRECTION, which means that we will also be given another distance to travel.

We will find that when we leave the A point and get to our next point, our distances will decrease immensely. We may find that from this second point, your next distance to go may be 30 feet or less, and this is when we are going to need to start using our tape measure.

Based on actual experience, i saw big "C" signs on old coconut trees distanced from each other, but as i am going farther trying to find the next "C" sign, the sign gets smaller and the distances in between the next"C" sign decreases also."--Thus one point, based on experience that the Imperial Japanese Treasure Burial Planners did somehow followed the "society's hidden codex"


Once we get the feel for this treasure "hiding and locating" system we won't have a need for paper maps.
Just think about it for a moment. When following the instructions on the map, you will, AT EVERY POINT where there is a change in direction and distance, find a boulder or some kind of PERMANENT object that will have signs and symbols on it helping you out.

By getting the knowledge and the feel for these maps, we will be able to spot these "helpers".
And that is why I can say that we don't have to have a map to locate ANY treasure, just ability.

Personally: Owning or accessing JIA treasure site map is much better compared to none, to remember, JIA engineers may have followed on some codes from the "secret society" codex but they definitely modified and strengthened their own.

As long as the treasure has been *monumented, and as long as those *monuments haven't been destroyed, and as long as we have the experience, we will be able to locate the exact position of the treasure rooms.
*Of course we should not expect real survey monunents, it could be now in the form of any unmovable odd looking rocks or boulders that can at least maintain its position thru eternity which only can be moved by an “act of god”.
If the Japanese treasure burial planner officers location is far from those said permanent structures, secondary choice of a modified *monument could be odd centennial hardwood trees. They can also set up bearings on big & prominent but ever fix mountains, such as the
Mount Apo, Philippines highest peak.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 08:04:40 PM
I do believe there are some few analytically inclined hunters who are really on the know...

Now, Treasure hunting for the JIA loot is really not that easy...

Of course, another variable now comes in question, such as, do we have the proper tools and equipments? – and in this connection comes another topic,

Getting a partner
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 27, 2013, 08:07:11 PM
Hayy kapoy... I got to rest for now...  back again tomorrow...
 :-* :-* :-* ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on February 27, 2013, 08:38:50 PM
and now...its starting to get interesting..... ;)

oh a little tidbit for you, the BP or bearing Picket card of the military surveyors..
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 06:37:27 AM
Thanks Jan.....

Some images too before proceeding....while organizing my topics here.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 06:46:20 AM
image 1

Just what is this?, found in Japan a focus beam?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 06:51:59 AM
more..
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 06:55:06 AM
another..
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 07:22:03 AM
One of our survey aide on the field on top of KIAGOT mountain fronting Digos, hey ya Treasure hunters of old, does it ring a bell?

The actual image is heavy on pixels and with that i am having troubles of posting, it shows the actual background that is of KIAGOT and COGON heights.

Anyways, the emphasis is on the Surveying topic and not a certain site that is for the meantime.
But during that actual survey, we did however find a hole by accident while following leads via an old BL monument circa 1933

Ok i'll just attach pics via MS word,,, be back on it in a while
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 11:07:22 PM
To continue...

 We have said that,

Personally, owning or accessing JIA treasure site map is much better compared to none, to remember, JIA engineers may have followed on some codes from the "secret society" codex but they definitely modified and strengthened their own.

As long as the treasure has been *monumented, and as long as those *monuments haven't been destroyed, and as long as we have the experience, we will be able to locate the exact position of the treasure rooms.
____________________________________________

But locating the exact position of the treasure on the surface is just the beginning, the first big problem is how to recover it underneath.

Imperial Japanese Golden Lily treasure burial design is by far more trickiest as compared to Pirate's treasure, Jesuit's, the Templar's & KGC's treasure.

Lot's of discussions and analysis based on some fellow Treasure Hunter's experiences has been shared on that regard--The Recovering Process.

Many variables now pops out such as:

1. Do we have the right tools and equipments?
2. Do we have ample finances to support the recovery process?
3. Do we have the right partners?
4. Do we have the knowledge?
5. Do we have the exact interpretations out of our inferred understanding on the details given on the map?, Lucky is the hunter who holds a Treasure Burial diagram.

If we honestly answered "yes" to these guide questions, i can only say good luck and stay safe...

These are just some of the common questions we oftentimes experience at this phase
that would take us into forever if i'll accommodate all the possible explanations and facts.

I believe i have some advantages as compared to others but conversely, others have also some advantages over me, in other words, i know that there are things that i knew that others do not know, in as much as, others knew something that i do not know.--The best solution for this is sharing.
As long as we are at par at this level and as far as i have no recoveries yet, i dare not talk in depth about this invasive recovering process for this time yet.

Most if not all, Japanese treasure burial design varies from site to site.

I am more of giving my views then on what we should focus to learn.

Let's now go to our next focus...

2. It’s something about astronomical/astrological observations
-it’s about CONSTELLATIONS: Plotting and connecting the missing points
-something about GEOMANCY

constellation/ treasure hunt pattern
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 11:48:09 PM

constellation/ treasure hunt pattern

INTRODUCTION TO CONSTELLATIONS

"Constellation" is the name we give to seeming patterns of stars in the night sky. "Stella" is the Latin word for star and a constellation is a grouping of stars. In general, the stars in these groups are not actually close to each other in space, they just appear to be close when viewed from Earth.
If we could travel by spaceship to another part of the galaxy, we would imagine an entirely different set of constellations. In the meantime, for us on Earth, the constellations are a handy way to locate a star in the sky.

On Earth, we see different constellations as we travel to different parts of the globe. The fact that some constellations were visible in the northern hemisphere and not the southern hemisphere, and vice-versa, was used more than 2000 years ago by Greek astronomers to argue that the Earth is round.
 
Long before the invention of the telescope, early civilizations invented star patterns and named them after animals, objects, heroes, gods, and beasts from stories and myths.

Providing a way to segment the sky, the constellations are used to describe and find the location of objects.
 
One of the first tasks for an observer is to learn the constellations, at what time of year they are visible and in which constellations interesting objects are found. To begin recognising constellations it is useful to take well-known reference points.

The Plough is probably the best-known reference point in the northern hemisphere where it is visible all year round. Within The Plough, Mizar is a double star, with a companion called Alcor, sometimes visible to the naked eye. There are numerous galaxies lying within the constellation of Ursa Major, plus other deep sky objects, to be explored by telescope.

In 1929 the International Astronomical Union defined 88 constellations that are today recognized as the "official" constellations. Many of these constellations are derived from the complex creations of Greek mythology, like Andromeda, Perseus, and Orion. Others came from ancient cultures such as the Egyptians and Chaldeans and still others were not defined until the 17th and 18th century.

Other patterns of stars are well known but are not constellations, an example of which is The Plough - a pattern formed from the seven brightest stars within the constellation of Ursa Major. Such patterns of stars are called asterisms and may contain stars from one or more constellations.

In the past, people used the constellations as markers. Some used the constellations to navigate their boats across the sea, to mark seasons of the year, or to locate special stars. Today, astronomers still use constellations as a handy marker to indicate a general area of the sky where far away celestial objects appear. Many of these extremely distant objects can be seen only with powerful telescopes.


IN CONTEXT TO TREASURE HUNTING

Supposedly the locations of the treasures, if plotted on a map, would reproduce the image of a constellation, for example if we believe Orion is a likely candidate.
 
This is a "short cut" built into the network that would allow someone to bypass the clues and pinpoint the location of every treasure simply by matching certain landmarks with certain stars in a constellation, overlaying an image of the constellation on a map, and plotting where the unmatched stars lie.

The key to this is of course identifying the landmarks and the corresponding stars, not to mention using the right constellation.

Accordingly, sometimes, there is also a second constellation that must be observed from a specific location as it passes through the sky, and at certain times it will be above certain landmarks, which match with the stars on the first constellation that gives the layout of the treasure network.

Sounds a lot more complicated than just following the clues,..

PROVEN APPLICATION:

This has been proVed to work out—In discovering the right and exact location of the entrance that leads to the recent discoveries and uncovering of some secrets of what is underneath the GIZA PLATEAU as well as its famous pyramids—they call that GIZA GEOMATRIX!!!

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 11:54:41 PM
IMAGES
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 28, 2013, 11:59:10 PM
Next, for tomorrow....

-something  about  SUNDIAL---using Sundial as a compass
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 02, 2013, 08:38:40 PM
The Giza Geomatrix    

is a name given to the Blueprint which uses the Star geometries laid to the ground, marking the location of entrances to either significant ancient underground storage sites - or for entrances into the vast underground facility built by the Ancients.
 
The Blueprint was fixed to a specific Stellar time in history which  enables a Time clock to be constructed, which in turn allows an examination of the repeating life cycles of our existence on this planet.

Work continues, to validate and unravel the information to this is still yielding.
You will find about its Files which supposes the scenario leading to the appearance of the pyramids and grids across our Planet.

Even though there are arguments whether its the constellation Cygnus or the Orion really fits the pattern, there are more than enough evidences that points to patterning to CONSTELLATIONS as well as GEOMETRIC alignments were used as guides in the overall lay-out and designs in almost all of the pyramids found in this planet, not only the GIZA pyramids.

Patterns seems to be hidden, hidden in plain sight but as we now know It is all in The Stars

Snake iconology ties to the geometry of the Cosmos, there is a sky to ground correlation we have more chance to nail it if we are using precessional/star geometries that are fixed for today and for the time period.

Looking back to ancient times, some say that the stars of Orion’s Belt lined closely with the 3 pyramids on the plateau. The theory gives possible reason to the positions of the Giza Pyramids,

This showed how the ancient design features of the entire Giza Plateau recorded a knowledge relating to Celestial Precession, and incorporated the micro/macro relationship of the Cosmos with mankind.

The concept demonstrates how a moment in time was frozen from the Precessional alignments to yield a Blueprint of star-to-ground geometry. This frozen moment captured the Great Pyramid Temple entrance door aligned to the Lyra Constellation star Vega; …the Temple doorway of Khafre aligned to the Invisible Circumpolar star which was the Heart of Draconis; …and the Temple doorway of Menkaure aligned to the Ursa Minor star Polaris. At the same time the major Star of Ursa Major, Benetnash, fell upon the NC2 location.

*Following CONSTELLATION PATTERNS and GEOMETRY, they found what they believed are hidden entrances for the tunnels and burial chambers. Upon plotting, GPR were used to confirm their suspicion of the hidden entrance, alas they were right. GPR readings supports it all...

(GPR performance and its readings on the GIZA PROJECT---I will tackle on this later on the GPR thread)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 02, 2013, 08:48:35 PM
I'll leave this thread for a while since i have to prepare for my teaching demonstration come monday, March 4. Educator applicants will be ranked according to our performance in the said demo. There will be approximately 300 educator applicants..... I'll perform first,,,, so much for this in the meantime but i'll be back for more......BV
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 02, 2013, 11:11:05 PM
>>something  about  SUNDIAL---using Sundial as a compass<<

Sir Bv,

Allow me to share this topic..and post some map which represent triangularization for my own interpretation, I was removed some character and measurement. And really what I felt exciting is the discussion about sundial as a compass. According to our mentor only our group even hes old comrade before he never discussed about the sun as a guide to locate the burried treasure but this still a big question to me if it is true until we can't find the treasure. ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 13, 2013, 06:46:55 PM
Trying to search the place via google earth, and i think I found the place. Sir Bv, please consider my post but if you want to remove I will help you to ask to our moderators to remove but i think this is a support of the topic.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 14, 2013, 04:58:56 PM
Hi Franke,

Go on, and that should be the spirit here, sharing...I'll be back when i have ample time.
 ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: t_hunter44 on March 15, 2013, 11:01:01 AM
Trying to search the place via google earth, and i think I found the place. Sir Bv, please consider my post but if you want to remove I will help you to ask to our moderators to remove but i think this is a support of the topic.
    The illustration with a Triangle with 3 mounds, whatever it is, and a line that was not indicated  that went through the three mounds  and even a Tree Trunk on top, looking at it and at your Google Earth, how on earth can you pinpoint your site on that Google Earth, you sure got an uncanny ability. I am almost afraid to ask, who made the triangulation?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 15, 2013, 11:31:17 AM
The illustration with a Triangle with 3 mounds, whatever it is, and a line that was not indicated  that went through the three mounds  and even a Tree Trunk on top, looking at it and at your Google Earth, how on earth can you pinpoint your site on that Google Earth, you sure got an uncanny ability. I am almost afraid to ask, who made the triangulation?

Sir,

I am the one who made the triangulation line, but the sketch it's coming from a long time friend who gave it. I don't know what type of character, below of the sketch is a place or barangay translated into english word. Trying to search the place but I think it's already changed didn't find the exact barangay writen in the note, only I interested is the sketch of a road or river.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on March 15, 2013, 11:48:19 AM
I'm gonna reply on this so called "Triangulation", firstly its NOT a "Triangulation" thats because you did not make 3 R.O's or "Reference Objects" logged and grid ref's made on a map.

secondly you had'nt or didnt use any accurate instruments to make a triangulation.
and really you have no idea what you are doing!

you have in fact wrecked this thread of education with your nonsensical posts.
i would suggest you go and sit in a corner somewhere......... ::)
Diagram of a triangulation for interest included below.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 15, 2013, 12:02:29 PM
I'm gonna reply on this so called "Triangulation", firstly its NOT a "Triangulation" thats because you did not make 3 R.O's or "Reference Objects" logged and grid ref's made on a map.

Sir,

I think no need to revail the exact measurement of the said sketch or map, as only I understand the word of E-W-N-S and degrees or measurement and never visited the site, one think I'm sure of is a marker and reference is made of nature and immovable.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on March 15, 2013, 01:02:39 PM

Sir,

I think no need to revail the exact measurement of the said sketch or map, as only I understand the word of E-W-N-S and degrees or measurement and never visited the site, one think I'm sure of is a marker and reference is made of nature and immovable.

in other words you have no idea of Triangulations!!
And "never visited" the site?? so your talking third hand info then...??
ENDEX
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: t_hunter44 on March 15, 2013, 01:21:08 PM

Sir,

I think no need to revail the exact measurement of the said sketch or map, as only I understand the word of E-W-N-S and degrees or measurement and never visited the site, one think I'm sure of is a marker and reference is made of nature and immovable.

in other words you have no idea of Triangulations!!
And "never visited" the site?? so your talking third hand info then...??
ENDEX
     Sorry for using Triangulation as that was an inappropriate word, should have used a TRIANGLE instead.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 15, 2013, 01:36:26 PM
in other words you have no idea of Triangulations!!
And "never visited" the site?? so your talking third hand info then...??
ENDEX

     Sorry for using Triangulation as that was an inappropriate word, should have used a TRIANGLE instead.

Sir,

Yep, at first no idea about triangle as bearing point or markers but time goes I realize that we are there for a long time but not giving any importance but now I learned it. Sooner or later I'm going to visit that site but not on TH activity, but to see what's in there and if I have the enough budget and based on the history, markers, live pointer no need to my group to move to other area as very far from our place.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on March 15, 2013, 03:24:52 PM
Sir,

Yep, at first no idea about triangle as bearing point or markers but time goes I realize that we are there for a long time but not giving any importance but now I learned it. Sooner or later I'm going to visit that site but not on TH activity, but to see what's in there and if I have the enough budget and based on the history, markers, live pointer no need to my group to move to other area as very far from our place.

"You learned it" ? in a couple of days?? hahahaha now your taking the Pi$$.
The surveyors here have took years to learn their skills, but you...only days..... :o

well there goes your credibility.....WhhoooOOSH !! GONE !!
anyway enough of you and your silly posts....bye.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 15, 2013, 03:41:50 PM
You learned it" ? in a couple of days?? hahahaha now your taking the Pi$$.
The surveyors here have took years to learn their skills, but you...only days.....

well there goes your credibility.....WhhoooOOSH !! GONE !!
anyway enough of you and your silly posts....bye.

Sir,

I'm here already almost a year, time goes I realize that we are there for a long time but not giving any importance but now I learned it, because of joining here this is confirmed my doubts and i realized the differences of our site before and now. Before we dig as long as we found signs but no reference like old tree, rock boulder, mountains, history and pointer.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: DINDO BAYAUA on March 15, 2013, 10:11:26 PM
I would have kept quiet on this topic although I know "something" is misnomer. I have been teaching it for quite sometime ago, then the subject cropped up.

I second to the point of Janner. He is right, that is not "triangulation". That sometimes is called "angular intersection" or simply triangle, to name a few, BUT THAT IS NOT “Triangulation”. A Triangulation problem is one quite complex surveying topic and in in computing too. It needs at least 3 reference point, and a distance of 1 or 2 sides so to compute the unknown sides of angle.

It will take you at least 4 semesters to know most of the basics theories…and quite a few years to master the actual practice and application.

Sorry, I cannot attach the scanned pictures of the triangulation problems in surveying for proof. I tried but I think it is too large a picture to post.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: t_hunter44 on March 16, 2013, 11:57:28 AM
I would have kept quiet on this topic although I know "something" is misnomer. I have been teaching it for quite sometime ago, then the subject cropped up.

I second to the point of Janner. He is right, that is not "triangulation". That sometimes is called "angular intersection" or simply triangle, to name a few, BUT THAT IS NOT “Triangulation”. A Triangulation problem is one quite complex surveying topic and in in computing too. It needs at least 3 reference point, and a distance of 1 or 2 sides so to compute the unknown sides of angle.

It will take you at least 4 semesters to know most of the basics theories…and quite a few years to master the actual practice and application.

Sorry, I cannot attach the scanned pictures of the triangulation problems in surveying for proof. I tried but I think it is too large a picture to post.
      Maybe it is time for you to open and teach us about Trigonometry, Geometry and Triangulation but that will take time and I sure do not have the time. Trigonometry was a subject that I never relished back in my college days and I am not about to go back to school, the heck with that. Has anybody ever heard of KISS, it is "KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID". That was not directed at anybody but I go by that as there is no point in giving myself complications, the simpler it is, the better it is, for me.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: DINDO BAYAUA on March 16, 2013, 07:23:09 PM
I rather hold on that "KISS"  :)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ghost on March 17, 2013, 06:27:11 AM
Trigonometry and Geometry? Try to master the Phytagorean theorem first (right angled triangle) as this is the very basis of trigonometry and geometry before posting and can not be done overnight only. It takes semesters or years in practical application to know, or try maybe the soh, cah and toa to name the basics. I also stick with TH44 and DB's  'KISS' so as not to complicate matters. Just my little contribution on that triangulation....... :)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 17, 2013, 01:41:50 PM
 :)
Guys, I say it again because of the word angle and traiangulation, I could compare now the site we had operated and now what site we have. :-*
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 03:20:07 AM
Hello,

Just got this time off..., i'm not abandoning this thread, just happened we are just so aware of our priorities and been multi-tasking.

Yes, i agree with DB's point in saying--- "A Triangulation problem is one quite complex surveying topic and in in computing too. It needs at least 3 reference point, and a distance of 1 or 2 sides so to compute the unknown sides of angle.

It will take you at least 4 semesters to know most of the basics theories…and quite a few years to master the actual practice and application.

Sorry, I cannot attach the scanned pictures of the triangulation problems in surveying for proof. I tried but I think it is too large a picture to post."


Yes, It will take someone 5 years of complete schooling to finish B.S in Geodetic Engineering as of present curriculum (just inquired in one College School in Davao that offered such course since my pretty daughter is now contemplating on becoming like his grandpa and uncles!--so no need for me to enroll for a 4th course ;) ;))..

Somehow, i'll try to post some topics about Area computations and or methods of determining an area of a tract of land.
There are actually 6 ways, that's according to Juny Pilapil La Putt, the author of the book ELEMENTARY SURVEYING INSTRUCTIONAL MANUAL...

I'll try to attach let me see....

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 03:23:20 AM
more
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 03:44:32 AM
okay, i'll give you more attachments about some surveying topics that mostly concerns us.
but its your taking now whether you want to do serious study about it, i am not here to discuss it, for i am also in the learning stages :D :D.

 Anyways, i will just have the convenience to just directly ask questions for a clearer understanding about such topics--to the above mentioned live references...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 03:47:07 AM
next page
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 04:01:58 AM
More on measuring distances
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 04:06:15 AM
More on measurement of distance...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 04:17:30 AM
MEASUREMENTS OF ANGLES AND DIRECTIONS

Now, this really concerns us all and let's dig into the bottom of this....you do your studies... and i'll have mine too.

The location of points and the orientation of lines frequently depend upon the measurement of angles and directions.
In surveying, directions are given by bearings and azimuths.

Let's enter now the basic principles of measuring and reckoning angles and directions ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 04:24:08 AM
oh, i was so engrossed- did not noticed its now quarter to 5 in the morning...
I slept and woke up early though... i'll be back later folks to finish this thread.

Anyways, i'm nearing completion for all the supposed topics..and watch out for---

GAIHOZU
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 11:57:12 AM
About Area Computations on pictures 116, 113,& 114;

One of the primary objects of most land surveys is to determine the area of tract of land is taken into projection upon a horizontal plane, and is not the actual area of the surface of the land. For precise determinations of the area of a large tract, such as a province or a country, the area is taken as a projection of the tract upon the earth's spheroidal surface at mean sea level.

There are actually 6 methods of determining areas:

1. Area of triangles
2. Area by coordinates
3. Area by coordinate squares
4. Area by double meridian distance or double parallel distance
5. Area of offsets from straight lines
 a) Trapezoidal rule
 b) Simpson's one third rule
6. Area by polar planimeter
________________________________

Area by triangles: The area of any field or tract can be found by dividing it up into a series of triangles, making the necessary measurements and then calculating the area by any of the usual trigonometric formulas. This method is excellent for small areas with few sides.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 01:25:52 PM
Partition of Land

There are many different problems which may arise in the subdivision of land and which may be solved simply by the application of the principles of trigonometry.

A subdivision often has the purpose of dividing an area into smaller parcels of a definite size.

Division of an area into certain proportional parts may be carried out by the use of special techniques in computations which involve the determination of missing bearings and distances of lines in a traverse.

Case 1: Dividing a tract of land into two parts by a line between two points
Case 2: Dividing a tract of land by a line running in a given direction
Case 3: To cut off a required area by a line through a given point
Case 4: To cut off a required area by a line running in a given directions

Measurements of Angles and Directions

The location of points and the orientation of lines frequently depend upon the measurement of angles and directions. In surveying, directions are given by bearings and azimuths.
We should know the basic principles of measuring and reckoning angles and directions.
We should learn how the relative direction of lines be obtained.

 Topics to learn:

1. Meridians:
a. True Meridian b. Magnetic Meridian c. Imaginary Meridian d. Grid Meridian

2. Methods of Determining or Establishing Meridians

a. Establishing Magnetic Meridian by Compass
b. Determining True North by aid of Sun and a Plumb line
c. Determining true north by the Rising and Setting of the Sun

3. Master the Units of Angular Measurement:

a. The Degree b. The Grad c. The Mil d. The Radian

4. Magnetic declination

5. Local Atrraction---( I have a true experiential story of one of our Survey Aides--he actually    found a small cache of treasure)

Measurements of Difference of Elevation: A very lenghty topic

Note:

In the context of Treasure Hunting, knowing various basic techniques & methods of getting exact distances, partitioning an area, mastery in getting the exact measurements of angles and directions increases our chances of success.
Subdivision of areas into smaller parcels, results in making maps that is of small scales.
This small scaled maps is what we should be wary about in Treasure Hunting.

Knowing the Measurements of exact Angles and Directions as much as Measurements of Difference of Elevation will lead us to the exact location of treasure.

All the points, grids and supposed monuments locations will be pointed out.
But all the important points will not be marked in the form of the usual survey monuments but by odd looking permanent structures, markers with signs.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 05:21:54 PM
Measurements of Angles and Directions

The location of points and the orientation of lines frequently depend upon the measurement of angles and directions. In surveying, directions are given by bearings and azimuths.
We should know the basic principles of measuring and reckoning angles and directions.
We should learn how the relative direction of lines be obtained.

 Topics to learn:

1. Meridians:
a. True Meridian b. Magnetic Meridian c. Imaginary Meridian d. Grid Meridian

2. Methods of Determining or Establishing Meridians

a. Establishing Magnetic Meridian by Compass
b. Determining True North by aid of Sun and a Plumb line
c. Determining true north by the Rising and Setting of the Sun
_____________________________________________________________

A meridian (or line of longitude):

 is the half of an imaginary great circle on the Earth's surface terminated by the North Pole and the South Pole, connecting points of equal longitude. The position of a point along the meridian is given by its latitude. Each meridian is perpendicular to all circles of latitude. Each is also the same size, being half of a great circle on the Earth's surface and therefore measuring 20,003.93 km (12,429.9 miles).
Meridian
 is a fixed line of reference for determining direction of lines.

1 . True Meridian

A north –south line passing through the geographical. It is sometimes known as the astronomic or geographic meridian and is generally adopted reference line.

2 . Magnetic Meridian

Lies parallel with the magnetic lines of force of the earth and is indicated by the direction of the magnetic needle of a compass.

3. Imaginary or Assumed Meridian

A reference line arbitrarily chosen or conceived and its relation to the true meridian ascertained later.

4. Grid Meridian

 A reference line based upon a plane coordinate system where grid north is parallel to a selected central meridian.

The angle between the magnetic and the true meridian is the magnetic declination, which is relevant for navigating with a compass.

Methods of Determining or Establishing Meridians

a. Establishing magnetic Meridian by Compass

The magnetic meridian can be established by setting the compass over any convenient point and then sighting to set a point or stake or other object that marks another point on the meridian. Several sights should be taken during the set-up. After each setting of the line of sight, the compass should be rotated about the vertical axis and then moved back until the needle reads zero. The mean of the point thus establish is assumed to be on the magnetic meridian, provided the observations are taken at a time of day when the declination is approximately at its mean value.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 05:26:20 PM
b.Determining true North by Aid of the Sun and a Plumb Line

On a level piece of ground, lean a pole toward the north and rest it in a crotch made by two sticks. Suspend a weight from the end of the pole so that it nearly touches the ground; then about an hour before noon, attach a string to a peg driven directly under the weight and, with sharpened stick attached to the other end of the string, describe an arc with a radius equal to the distance from the peg to the shadow of the tip of the pole. Drive a peg on the arc where the shadow of the tip of the pole rests.

 About an hour after noon, watch the shadow of the tip as it approaches the eastern side of the arc and drive another peg where it crosses. By means of a tape or a string, find the middle point of the straight line joining the last two pegs mentioned. A straight line joining this middle point and the peg under the weight will be True North.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 05:45:33 PM

c.   Determining True north by the Rising and Setting of the Sun

Observe the magnetic *azimuth of the sun at rising and setting on the same day or at setting on one day and rising the next. Add the two azimuths together.

Take the difference between this some and 360 degrees. One half of this difference is the declination of the compass and is East, if the sum of the two azimuths is less than 360 degrees; West, if it is greater.

In using this method the observations are best taken when the object is just above the true horizon.

(*Azimuth- is another term used to indicate the direction of lines. The azimuth of any line is the clockwise angle designated as beieng measured between either  the north end or the south end of the reference meridian and the line in question.)

Ex. The observed magnetic azimuth from north of the rising sun is just above the true horizon 110 degrees. As it is just about to set in the afternoon in the opposite horizon the observed azimuth from north is 260 degrees. Determine the magnetic declination.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 07:57:04 PM

Other alternate ways to Find True North Without a Compass

Which way is north? Whether you're lost in the woods or you're trying to install a sundial in your yard, you're bound to want to find true north from time to time, and chances are when the time comes you won't have a compass. What's more, even if you do have a compass, it will point to magnetic north, which, depending on your location in the world, can vary a great deal from true north. So what's an intrepid explorer to do?

Read this to find several different ways to find your way.


The Shadow-Tip Method (same logic to the sun and plumb line)

1. Place a stick upright in the ground so that you can see its shadow. Alternatively, you can use the shadow of a fixed object. Nearly any object will work, but the taller the object is, the easier it will be to see the movement of its shadow, and the narrower the tip of the object is, the more accurate the reading will be. Make sure the shadow is cast on a level, brush-free spot.

2. Mark the tip of the shadow with a small object, such as a pebble, or a distinct scratch in the ground. Try to make the mark as small as possible so as to pinpoint the shadow's tip, but make sure you can identify the mark later.

3. Wait 10-15 minutes. The shadow tip will move mostly from west to east in a curved line.

4. Mark the new position of the shadow's tip with another small object or scratch. It will likely move only a short distance.

5.Draw a straight line in the ground between the two marks. This is an approximate east-west line.

6.Stand with the first mark (west) on your left, and the other (east) on your right.You are now facing mostly toward true north, regardless of where you are in the world. The illustration shows that the sun and marker at Points 1 is what is happening for Step 2. At Points 2, it shows what is happening for Step 4. This method is based on the fact that the sun moves across the sky from East to West.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 08:18:07 PM

Alternate Shadow-Tip Method for Increased Accuracy

1. Set up a stick as perpendicular to the level ground as possible and mark the first shadow-tip as above. For this method, take your first reading in the morning, at least an hour or so before midday.

2. Find an object or length of string, etc., exactly the same length as the shadow.
 
3. Continue taking measurements of the shadow's length every 10-20 minutes. The shadow will shrink before midday and will grow after midday.

4. Measure the shadow length as the shadow grows. Use the string or object you used to measure the length of the initial shadow. When the shadow grows to exactly the same length as the string (and hence exactly the same length as your first measurement), mark the spot.

5. Draw a line connecting the first and second marks as above. Once again, this is your east-west line, and if you stand with the first mark on your left and the second on your right, you will be facing true north.


 
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 09:34:39 PM

Using the Stars: Northern Hemisphere

1. Locate the North Star (Polaris) in the night sky. The North Star is the last star in the handle of the Little Dipper constellation. If you have trouble finding it, find the Big Dipper.

The two lowest stars in the Big Dipper (the outermost stars of the cup of the dipper) form a straight line that "points" to the North Star. You may also find the constellation Cassiopeia, which is always opposite the Big Dipper.

 The North Star is located about midway between the central star of Cassiopeia and the Big Dipper (see attached figure).

2. Draw an imaginary line straight down from the North Star to the ground. This direction is true north, and if you can find a landmark in the distance at this point, you can use it to guide yourself.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 09:44:12 PM
Using the Stars: Southern Hemisphere

1. Find the Southern Cross constellation. In the southern hemisphere, the North Star is not visible, and no single star always indicates north or south, but you can use the Southern Cross and the pointer stars as your guide.

 The Southern Cross constellation is formed by five stars, and the four brightest stars form a cross that is angled to one side.
 
2. Identify the two stars that make up the long axis of the cross. These stars form a line which "points" to an imaginary point in the sky which is above the South Pole. Follow the imaginary line down from the two stars five times the distance between them.

3. Draw an imaginary line from this point to the ground, and try to identify a corresponding landmark to steer by. Since this is true south, true north is directly opposite it (behind you as you are looking at the point).
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 09:47:47 PM

Using the Stars: Southern Hemisphere

1. Find the Southern Cross constellation. In the southern hemisphere, the North Star is not visible, and no single star always indicates north or south, but you can use the Southern Cross and the pointer stars as your guide.

The Southern Cross constellation is formed by five stars, and the four brightest stars form a cross that is angled to one side.
 
2. Identify the two stars that make up the long axis of the cross. These stars form a line which "points" to an imaginary point in the sky which is above the South Pole. Follow the imaginary line down from the two stars five times the distance between them.

3.Draw an imaginary line from this point to the ground, and try to identify a corresponding landmark to steer by. Since this is true south, true north is directly opposite it (behind you as you are looking at the point).
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 09:50:55 PM

Using the Stars: Equator

1. The Orion Constellation is visible from both hemispheres depending on the time of the year. It is a permanent feature on the equator.

2.Look for Orion's Belt. Orion has several prominent stars. The 'belt' (3 stars in a row) runs from East to West. Look for that, it has a 'sword' attached to it.

3. Look in the direction opposite where the belt was. You should be able to make out its 'head' and arms. That is the general direction of North.

4. Orion lays across teh Equator:teh Belt rises & sets at east & West
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 24, 2013, 11:25:30 PM

Watch Method: Northern Hemisphere

1. Find an analog watch (the kind with hour and minute hands) that is set accurately.Place it on a level surface, such as the ground, or hold it horizontal in your hand.

2. Point the hour hand at the sun.
 
3. Bisect (that is, find the centre point of) the angle between the hour hand and the twelve o'clock mark (the number 12 on the watch). The centre of the angle between the hour hand and twelve o'clock mark is the north-south line.

If you don't know which way is north and which south, just remember that no matter where you are, the sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
;) ask a mason...

In the northern hemisphere the sun is due south at midday. If your watch is set to daylight saving time bisect the angle between the hour hand and the one o'clock mark instead.

Watch Method: Southern Hemisphere

1. Use an analogue watch as above, and point the watch's twelve o'clock mark (the number 12) toward the sun. If your watch is set to daylight saving time, point the one o'clock mark toward the sun.

2. Bisect the angle between the twelve o'clock mark (or one o'clock mark if using daylight saving time) and the hour hand to find the north-south line. If you're unsure which way is north, remember that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west no matter where you are. In the southern hemisphere, however, the sun is due north at midday.

Tips

• When trying to locate the North Star it is important to remember that, despite popular belief, the North Star is NOT the brightest star in the sky. The only remarkable thing about it is that it is the only star in the sky that does not move.

• If you only have a digital watch, you can still aim the watch accurately at the sun, as you figure out where the hour hand will be. Use 12, 3, 6 and 9 o clock's angles to guide you to the other hours, smaller increments for half/quarter hours.

• In Northern Hemisphere, halfway between hour hand and 12 is South. Halfway between 12 and hour hand in Southern Hemisphere is North.

• These methods may require practice to perfect, so it's a good idea to try them a couple times when you can check your readings. That way, you'll be able to rely on them if you're in a survival situation.

• If you have a 24h dial on your clock (like many pilot watches), then just point the hour hand at the sun, and north is at the 0/24h mark

Warnings

• The North Star becomes higher in the sky the further north you travel, and it is not useful about 70° N latitude.

• The shadow-tip methods are not recommended in the polar regions, which are latitudes above 60° in either hemisphere.

• The watch method is not recommended in lower latitudes, particularly below 20° in either hemisphere.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 12:01:46 AM

 :-\ :-[uh uhh redundant pic sorry...it should have been the watch pic.

Anyways here's more pics for you to associate your understandings with its related readings
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 01:19:01 AM

Note: Use of a compass

This can work but will be inaccurate because the compass points at magnetic north and you must correct for magnetic deviation.

Magnetic deviation varies around the world and even changes over time. It can even be affected  by local forces such as the presence of steel and magnetic rocks.
(LOCAL ATRRACTION). This is not a recommended method.

These other methods (without using a magnetic compass) of deriving true north and south is extremely accurate and is favorable over magnetic compasses in situations where magnetic fields may interfere with your results.

Whats the difference between "true north" and "magnetic north"?

True North is land-based while Magnetic North isn't. This makes True North constant and stable while the Magnetic North is flexible. You can determine the location of True North by the North Star while you cannot with Magnetic North; it is generally determined by simply pointing the needle of the compass.
 
True north is a constant and refers to the geographic North Pole. Magnetic north tends to shift and refers to the pole of the Earth's magnetic field. In mid 2002, true north and magnetic north were approximately 590 miles apart.

The poles of the Earth's magnetic field are different from its geographic poles. Maps are aligned along true north, so hunters have to make adjustments when navigating by compass.

In navigation, the difference between true north and magnetic north is known as declination. Almost all, Geological Survey maps print relevant declination information, and the maps are updated every five years to account for shift.

Those traveling in Northern California, for instance, have to make declination adjustments of roughly 18 degrees.
The Earth's magnetic field stems from its molten metallic core, much of which is iron. Iron is a fairly common element, since it can't be burned off during the fiery formation of stars. Iron is magnetic because its inner electron shells are slightly unstable.

Solution?

Some create a deviation card by doing a compass swing.
Traditionally this would be done by taking bearings on fixed land features, nowadays however GPS which is not subject to magnetic deviation can be used to compare headings.[/u]

The deviation card can then be used when converting between compass and magnetic headings.
There are a few, fortunately rare, locations in the earth's magnetic field where magnetic anomalies occur.
Fortunately these sources of magnetic anomaly will be indicated on your charts.

The CADET rule for variation;

When converting from Compass Add East to get True.
It follows that converting from true to magnetic is the reverse, subtract east.

For deviation you can use the saying;

Deviation east, compass least, in other words subtract from the magnetic course.
Deviation west compass best, in other words add the correction.


 
more next....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 01:27:07 AM

What hemisphere is the Philippines in>?

The Philippines

Situated on the western edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Philippines is one of the major crossroads in the eastern hemisphere. It claims title to the second largest archipelago on the planet, with over 7,100 individual islands within its borders and it is home to over 100 ethnic groups and hundreds of language dialects.

Another question another answer?...

Is the Philippines located in the northern hemisphere or southern hemisphere?

In: Travel › Geography

The Republic of Philippines is located west of the Pacific Ocean. Philippines is situated along the Ring of Fire. This nation of islands is located in the northern hemisphere and eastern hemisphere.

So will follow our readings based on northern...

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 09:08:05 AM
okay get it on....Let's review, let's study now :) :) ;)

Here's some quotes about knowledge;


"Knowledge is not a passion from without the mind, but an active exertion of the inward strength, vigor and power of the mind, displaying itself from within."   
 

 Ralph Lauren 

"Knowledge is happiness, because to have knowledge -- broad, deep knowledge -- is to know true ends from false, and lofty things from low"
 

 Helen Keller

"The more the fruits of knowledge become accessible to men, the more widespread is the decline of religious belief"   

 Sigmund Freud

And from Janner's RAF motto, really

KNOWLEDGE DISPELS FEARS!!!

Read today and lead tomorrow...halina't magbasa
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 09:18:00 AM
 
“Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some to be chewed and digested.”
― Francis Bacon
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 09:22:35 AM

“Knowledge is power? No. Knowledge on its own is nothing, but the application of useful knowledge, now that is powerful.”
― Rob Liano
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 09:35:55 AM


“The world is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.”
― Bertrand Russell
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on March 25, 2013, 10:05:14 AM


“The world is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.”
― Bertrand Russell

Many years ago, when the War in South East Asia had come to it's glorious end, I was a Structural Geologist and we spent many good times in the Desert getting bug bit, dirty and totally wasted at night around a camp fire.  It's amazing how all things come together after 6 beers and a couple of joints.  Our calculations were done out of Tables in books and using SLIDE RULES !!!  Bad times were had by all.  So for those of you who have been a surveyor or just a  " Stick Man ", I leave you with these quotes - - - .


“I would have more people skills if I had people with skills.”

“My party chief wanted to go someplace he had never been before…. so I took him to the rear property line.”

“Surveying – it is a great career, but a lousy business.”

“People do not choose to be surveyors, they are born that way.”

“If you really want to know where your property line is, ask your neighbor.”

“I remember surveying the ad-joiner in 1957.  There was an SIB set by Pierce on that corner.”

“Why did they let me build my house on their property?  Someone should have stopped me.”

“I got a coordinate from Google earth, and laid out my property line with my hand held GPS.  What do you mean it is not right.”

“Yeah, I saw the survey bars along the road, but I found that a few good hits with a sledgehammer and they will come right out.  I use them to hold my barn door open and as pry bars.”

“I took a surveying course in college in 1962.  If I help out the crew, will it save me some money?”

“My deed says I own 100 acres.  Your plan shows only 99.5 acres.  You stole some of my land.”

“It’s got to be right.  I had it surveyed by my neighbor's cousin’s friend who used to work for Hydro.”

OK so only a surveyor would find those amusing, except the one about Google. 


Z


Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 10:25:01 AM
LOL :D :D :D
My Pop and bros says they'll have a good day after reading those words Zobex,
Nice...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 07:49:33 PM
again a little bit from,

Magnetic Declination

It is called the difference between the north geographic pole and the north magnetic pole.
Depending on where you are on the earth, the angle of declination will be different - from some locations, the geographic and magnetic poles are aligned so declination is minimal, but from other spots, the angle between the two poles is pretty big.

In context to T-hunting:

Does it make good sense to use a map's declination information if that map is more than 70 years old?, to those Golden Lily Maps and other small scale Japanese Treasure Maps???
 
Maybe these simple ways could answer that;

1. Use recently published maps and or that one  taken from google earth and or GPS (not affected by declination) but in conjunction with the old map.

2. Know the current declination for the area and use that information for your readings/navigations.

3. Adjust your compass


On many compasses, you are able to adjust the declination by twisting a ring, using a screw, or some other method of changing where the orienting arrow sits in relation to the ring.

If you used a compass set with 0 degrees declination in your treasure site, for example, where the declination may be 12 degrees East, the compass would tell you that you're heading North when you're actually heading 12 degrees East of North.
You'd quickly wind up off course and lost.
 
By adjusting the compass to match the declination on your map, the orienting arrow now appears to be off center from North, which is how it should be.

Now, when you put RED in the SHED (needle inside orienting arrow), the North indicated at the index pointer is true north and matches your map.

You can continue to check your location and chart your course correctly.
Whenever you stop and check your heading or take a bearing on a distant object, the degrees read on the dial will be the actual true degrees.

The only thing that looks a bit odd is that the north end of the compass needle does not point directly at the N when you are heading due North.

4. If you have a compass with no declination adjustment or you just like math, then you can do the declination calculations in your head---again you can do the math in your head.



Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 25, 2013, 08:05:51 PM
..........
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 26, 2013, 01:57:57 AM

Now i believe we have dwelt so much about the basics of surveying, so it's time now to shift back to our main theme on how the Japanese Imperial Government used to its advantage Militarily their advancement of Surveying and Mapmaking.

Let's start with this quite controversial subject about Imperial Japanese Army's GAIHOZU MAPS

Gaihozu:

Are the maps of areas outside Japanese territories mostly general topographic maps.
Gaihozu. Also referred to variously in the past as imperial maps, colonial surveys, or captured military maps,

The Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army, by the end of the Pacific War in 1945 produced and reproduced predominantly maps of scales ranging from 1:25,000 to 1:500,000.

Gaihozu include those maps which were overtly surveyed and drawn by Japanese surveying squads (as was the case in militarily occupied territories), those which were produced by surveyors and intelligence officers of the Japanese army, who were dispatched by sealed order, in a secret manner (for instance, in disputed areas), and those which were reproduced from topographic maps drawn by land survey departments of other countries.

Most of Gaihozu were of the high degree of secrecy based on military concern, and very few official records exist as for the production processes.

Most maps created in this way were strictly controlled with classification such as a “secret”, a “military secret”, and a “military top secret”.

The strictness of the control over the total number of map sheets was such that it is said that it was not the situation of using these maps for actual campaign in front lines, although a considerable number of sheets were used for military exercises.

Their production dates back to 1888 before the Sino Japanese War outbreak, and their geographical coverage stretches to Alaska northward, areas of U.S. mainland eastward, Australia  southward, and westward to parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan, including an isolated case of Madagascar.
 
Small-scale compiled maps by continent were also produced.

Such a manner of usage left a huge number of Gaihozu intact at the time of Japan’s military defeat in 1945. These maps were doomed to requisition by the allied forces, and it was expected that they should be disposed on a large scale beyond the reach of the occupation forces.
 
However, most Gaihozu, produced in the above mentioned circumstances, have high values in terms of scientific research and education, as well as other non-military purposes, being as straightforward records of the land surface and landscape in the end of the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.
 
Therefore, some scholars, who feared scatter and loss of Gaihozu, tried their emergency evacuation. As long as the writer acknowledges, they were scholars such as Tanakadate Shuzo, who held a professorship of geography, founded de facto in April, 1945, at the Faculty of Science, Tohoku University, and Tada Fumio, who was an assistant professor of the Institute of Geography at the University of Tokyo and served as a researcher at the Research Institute for Natural Resources, Tokyo.
 
In addition, it appears that a considerable amount of maps were carried out from the spot of incineration disposal.

Tanakadate and others visited the General Staff Headquarters (formerly the Japanese Imperial Army) at Ichigaya, Tokyo, in September, 1945, immediately before the stationing of the allied forces, and, with their permission, carried out emergency arrangement of a large number of Gaihozu and domestic topographic maps, and removed them from the General Staff Headquarters and their detached office which existed at the Meiji University basement at Kanda, Tokyo.
 
Emeritus Professors of the Tokyo Metropolitan University, Nakano Tadamasa, and of Hosei University, Mitsui Kazuo, both of whom were then researchers at the Research Institute for Natural Resources, were engaged in conveyance of the maps to the institute which was near the Shin-okubo railway station.

From around 1960, the maps moved there were arranged mainly by the former Professor of the Ochanomizu University, Asai Tatsuro, who was a researcher at this research institute at that time, and were distributed to about 80 places, such as the Kyoto University, the Rikkyo University, the Hiroshima University, the University of Tokyo, the University of Ruhr, the University of Tsukuba, the Kumamoto University, and the Ochanomizu University.
 
The emergency arrangement and conveyance preparation to the Tohoku University were led by Doi Kikukazu (Professor at the Shizuoka University, deceased), the then informally designated assistant lecturer at the Tohoku University, with the then students including Okamoto Jiro (Emeritus Professor at the Hokkaido University of Education), and Fukui Hideo (the then future professor of the Tohoku University, deceased), and Mita Ryoichi (an officer at Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, the Japan Coast Guard, who met with the fatal eruption of the Myojin-sho submarine volcano in 1952) among others.

Gaihozu were carried to Tohoku University in Sendai by a railroad freight car. The allied forces also carried out a lot of materials including Gaihozu immediately after requisition of the General Staff Headquarters, and it is said that the maps are now stored at the U.S. National Diet Library, Clark University, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and so forth.

 The Tohoku University’s possession of the Gaihozu

Among the about 10,000 maps (approximately 100,000 sheets) carried into the Faculty of Science, the Tohoku University, situated at Katahira-cho at that time, a part of domestic topographic maps were put in order immediately after their transfer, and they were used for education and research in geography.

However, it is said that a hesitant atmosphere prevailed where Gaihozu were treated in a rather covert manner probably in coincidence with the occupation by the allied forces, and the maps went from one store to another within the university campus following relocation of the Institute of Geography, which made it difficult to give sufficient room for arrangement and cataloguing.

The persons who were then related to the Institute and those concerned in academic societies based at adjuscent institutions recall that a part of Gaihozu were used as wrapping paper, which was scarce at that time, for dispatch of society periodicals, if the number of available sheets for the same map was many.

Following the 1994 decision to construct the Museum of Natural History at the Faculty of Science, a pending question for years, Gaihozu were arranged and classified on a full scale by the whole staff and students of the Institute of Geography. It turned out that the Tohoku University collection includes no maps of the U.S. mainland areas, which are thought to be part of the geographical coverage of Gaihozu, and that many maps are of China, India, Burma, and Indonesia, other Pacific Islands, Thailand and  also some of the Philippines but most were missing.

Note: There were maps from the Philippines, there was a small scale map of Mount Apo and a map catalouged as “near Davao” that caught my fancy, but many were missing…???? (Guess what was that?, your guess is as good as mine)
 

The Museum, opened at the Faculty site in Aobayama in October, 1995, systematically accommodates the inventoried Gaihozu, and 15 sheets were selected for open permanent exhibition, which were of Mount Agung in Bali, Imphal, Kwangtung, and Pearl Harbor in Honolulu among others.
 
Fifty years have passed since the maps were carried out of the General Staff Headquarters. The Institute of Geography then donated approximately 10,000 and 8,000 sheets of the original maps (if relatively many sheets were available for one map) and their photocopied versions (if only a few original remained) to the Geographical Survey Institute under the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, and the Gifu Prefectural Library respectively at their request, on condition of wide opening of the collection to the general public.
 
Gaihozu transfered to the Gifu Prefectural Library are exhibited at its World Distribution Map Center, and the writer learns that the institution attracts many users. The Institute of Geography also exchanged maps of China with the Department of Geography, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, which accommodates a huge collection of Gaihozu, and the two institutions supplemented each other the original and photocopied versions which one institution missed.

These donation and exchange resulted in the increase in the number of maps to about 12,000 and the decrease in the total number of map sheets to approximately 72,000. Although small part of this collection consist of topographic maps of the former Japanese territories (South Saghalien, Korea, Taiwan and others) as well as domestic ones (with illustration of fortified zones), hydrographic charts and small-scale compiled maps, and are therefore excluded from the category of Gaihozu, these maps are also among those which were transfered from the General Staff Headquarters in September, 1945.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 26, 2013, 02:00:22 AM
more will be flowing next, got to sleep now.....signi'n off...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on March 26, 2013, 07:19:03 AM
I doubt the shift or drift in Mag Dec would mean a whole lot when working on a possible Golden Lilly map, should any of us ever find one and that is really unlikely.

Here is an animated gif showing the overall Mag Drift, fun to watch.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/43/Earth_Magnetic_Field_Declination_from_1590_to_1990.gif

Any authentic map we might find would most likely have a variance of several degrees at the least from true readings just by poor quality compass that the lack of ability to use it.  Most maps I have seen have no compass readings other than a North line and a scale and most do not even have that.  I have seen and played with several IJA field compass's.  A Cub Scout compass is more accurate let along a Boy Scout compass.  None of which have Mag Dec adjustments.

Z



Z


again a little bit from,

Magnetic Declination

It is called the difference between the north geographic pole and the north magnetic pole.
Depending on where you are on the earth, the angle of declination will be different - from some locations, the geographic and magnetic poles are aligned so declination is minimal, but from other spots, the angle between the two poles is pretty big.

In context to T-hunting:

Does it make good sense to use a map's declination information if that map is more than 70 years old?, to those Golden Lily Maps and other small scale Japanese Treasure Maps???
 
Maybe these simple ways could answer that;

1. Use recently published maps and or that one  taken from google earth and or GPS (not affected by declination) but in conjunction with the old map.

2. Know the current declination for the area and use that information for your readings/navigations.

3. Adjust your compass


On many compasses, you are able to adjust the declination by twisting a ring, using a screw, or some other method of changing where the orienting arrow sits in relation to the ring.

If you used a compass set with 0 degrees declination in your treasure site, for example, where the declination may be 12 degrees East, the compass would tell you that you're heading North when you're actually heading 12 degrees East of North.
You'd quickly wind up off course and lost.
 
By adjusting the compass to match the declination on your map, the orienting arrow now appears to be off center from North, which is how it should be.

Now, when you put RED in the SHED (needle inside orienting arrow), the North indicated at the index pointer is true north and matches your map.

You can continue to check your location and chart your course correctly.
Whenever you stop and check your heading or take a bearing on a distant object, the degrees read on the dial will be the actual true degrees.

The only thing that looks a bit odd is that the north end of the compass needle does not point directly at the N when you are heading due North.

4. If you have a compass with no declination adjustment or you just like math, then you can do the declination calculations in your head---again you can do the math in your head.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on March 26, 2013, 07:29:17 AM
OK Students, When is a Map a Map and When is a Map NOT a Map ???

A Map must have TWO things to make it a map.  A North Line and a Scale.  Not having those requirements, the map is a CARTOON  !!!!

We used to get hit over the head with things like this.  Quickly we started putting North Lines and Scales on everything including hand written work, fliers and hand bills announcements for  beer and pizza parties and just about anything we could write on.  We even painted a North Line and Scale on the side of our Jeep we used to go out into the field in.  That really messed people up.  Our response was, we always knew which way North was because that is the way the Jeep is pointing and we knew how far we gone because it was measured on the side.  Sounds official when three guys are all dressed up in khaki field gear driving a camouflage jeep.

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 26, 2013, 07:50:36 AM
Most maps I have seen have no compass readings other than a North line and a scale and most do not even have that.


Yes, that i wanted to confirm (for any Golden Lily Maps)
Anyone who got hold of the CD-ROM of Seagraves' Gold Warriors which promised to present some samples of authentic Golden lily sites???, please share it here anyone? just one Golden Lily map presented in that CD-ROM so that we can at least study one.
 
Seems similar to some of those Gaihozu maps strategically created for the Imperial Japanese Army---no compass readings other than a North line and a scale


Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 26, 2013, 08:03:41 AM

I will present Gaihozu maps in chronological order (from the oldest to the "latest")
The "latest"-that is near world war two mostly shows that clearly--no compass readings other than a North line and a scale.

 The known "oldest" was written in the very native Japanese characters kanji?, katakana or hiragana.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: franke on March 26, 2013, 10:32:15 AM
Sir Ven,

The one I posted, just confirmed it's a katakana character based on searching of translation east, west, north and south and some character, but I won't post it completely until I visited the site and if still existing and still virgin. If times come I confirm those area is already touch and empty I post it here for studying purposes.

Thanks.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 26, 2013, 11:12:53 AM

 North line and a scale

Well i reviewed my files here, some have complete compass bearings, some have only the North line and scale but some, none. But most of my files here were just cuts or dissected part of a whole map and let's make do with what little we have than none.

These Gaihozo maps were now presented as part and in accordance with that long delayed post war Disclosure Act that post war Japanese government agreed and that Disclosure Act movements by Japanese citizens themselves lobbied for how many years for Japan’s first national information disclosure law which took effect  April 2001 – and was met with thousands of applications filed at government agencies within the first weeks of operation.
(I will present this later too.)

Nonetheless, let's just focus on our concern here.

With those type of Japanese G.L maps with only North line and scale and those with no compass bearings and scales---What then can we infer to these?

Maybe that means, anyone with the exact knowledge can decode the map, and maybe all infos are already given in the map where it all lays there to be rightly decoded? Or, is there a special but separate loot burial diagrams derived from one big scaled "Regional Map"?

Also we have to remember what Seagraves had emphasized in his Gold warrior book that according to the real Benjamen Valmores, ;) ;), the maps entrusted to him by Tsuneyoshi Takeda or "Kimso" for that matter were composed of 3 series for one specific site alone, that is the white, the blue and the red series respectively. The white as "vicinity or sketch map", the blue or the red, can either be as 'directional map" and a "trap map" (i might have interchanged the last two said maps).

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Gboy on March 26, 2013, 04:31:14 PM

I had 3 maps on one G.L. site or big vol site.......2 of which are vicinity maps and one are the structural map or trap map of the tunnel complex (cross section of the entire mountain, several tunnel levels and treasure chamber).

With this underground structural treasure map, somehow I was able to get the idea how complex the G. L. sites are...how thick the concrete chambers for each level, what kind of traps do you expect, what kind of sand colors or rock colors on each tunnel, where the water comes from the water trap, etc....

IF THIS IS THE STANDARD DESIGN OF ALL G.L. SITEs, NO WAY AN ORDINARY TREAS HUNTER CAN GET IT....N-O---W-A-Y   >:(  ......THATS WhY, AFTER SEEING THIS G.L. OR BIG VOL SITE MAP.....I STOP DIGGING ... ;D
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 11:04:02 AM

With this underground structural treasure map, somehow I was able to get the idea how complex the G. L. sites are...how thick the concrete chambers for each level, what kind of traps do you expect, what kind of sand colors or rock colors on each tunnel, where the water comes from the water trap, etc....

IF THIS IS THE STANDARD DESIGN OF ALL G.L. SITEs, NO WAY AN ORDINARY TREAS HUNTER CAN GET IT....N-O---W-A-Y   >:(  ......THATS WhY, AFTER SEEING THIS G.L. OR BIG VOL SITE MAP.....I STOP DIGGING ... ;D

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Gboy welcome aboard and thanks for sharing, and that will be much better if you mind sharing some of those you got ;) ;) ;), mind you friend, you're right those G.L sites are too hard for an individual hunter....

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 11:43:54 AM

I remember, in one of my readings, that was in Wikipedia, something about the Matsushiro Underground Imperial Headquarters, Coordinates:  36.545811°N 138.203931°E

The Matsushiro Underground Imperial Headquarters (松代大本営跡 Matsushiro Daihon'ei Ato?, was a large underground bunker complex built during the Second World War in the Matsushiro suburb of Nagano, Japan.

The facility was constructed so that the central organs of government of Imperial Japan could be transferred there. In its construction, three mountains, symbolic of Matsushiro Municipality were damaged.
Parts of the caves are open to the public today, and are operated as a tourist attraction by Nagano.

Construction
 
Construction began on November 11, 1944 and continued until Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945. Construction was 75% completed at the end of the war, with 5,856.6 square meters (63,040 sq ft) of floor-space (59,635 cubic meters (2,106,000 cu ft) of volume) excavated.

Between 7,000 and 10,000 Korean slave laborers were used to build the complex, and it is estimated that 1,500 of them died. Forty-six Koreans disappeared on August 15, 1945, when Japan surrendered. The project cost ¥200,000,000
 
 A diagram of the complex

The complex was an interlinked series of tunnels underneath several mountains. Facilities for theImperial General Headquarters and palace functions were constructed under Mount Maizuru; military communications under Mount Saijo; government agencies, NHK and central telephone facilities under Mount Zōzan; the residences of the imperial family under Mount Minakami, and the Imperial Sanctuary under Mount Kobo.

The original purpose of the complex was to serve as an alternative headquarters for the Imperial General headquarters. However, in March 1945, secret orders were issued to add a palace to the complex. Yoshijirō Umezu informed Emperor Hirohito about construction of the complex in May, but did not tell him that it contained a palace.

This is a lengthy description in Wikipedia and to avoid distracting our thread i will post most of the description on the thread "Why Tunnels Are Round".

But what struck me most is this lines

While the project was an operational secret in the guise of a warehouse, from the statement of a local Japanese labourer, rumours were rife in the surrounding villages and towns that the emperor was coming to town. The cause of the rumours was due to the massive amounts of cargo that came on trains.

see below attachment of the Diagram for the said Imperial Japanese Tunnel Complex.

I believe, this is the fortress of them all, above all other wartime Imperial Japanese Tunnel Complexes----THE SUPPOSED RESTING PLACE OF ALL LOOTED TREASURES.

Gboy, does the one you're holding looks like this?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Gboy on March 27, 2013, 12:18:02 PM

   NOPE ...

1) It looks like a basic Japanese map with lots of Japs characters.
2) But instead of top view, its in side view and it describe the entire cross section of the whole mountain, underground tunnel stories or level, and treasure chamber.
3) Each underground level (stories) it describes what kind of composition of each entire level......ex: hard cement, soft cement, mud, sand, hollow space, rocks, water, etc)...each level or stories had different compositions. Each level or story is est. 10 feet thick just like bldg. story or tunnel level.
4) It describes the flow of water from the river/waterfalls towards the water trap in one of the underground level or story.
5) It describes the treasure tunnel chamber and the traps that surrounded it.
6) It had lots of Japs descriptions, measurements, etc.
7) Based on my observation of the map drawings.....from the ground level, it probably had more or less 10-15 underground stories or tunnel with different compositions....then treasure chamber we suspect as big as basketball court.
8) On top of the ground level...is the entire mountain... ;D .... meaning you have to remove the entire mountain then you dig 15 stories underground....hehe .. ;D

I suspect this is the standard design of all Japs G.L. or big vol sites..but I maybe wrong also.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 12:20:08 PM
Let's get back to our topic Gaihozu, right after some rest....
Hello everybody have a contemplative Holy Week :) :) :)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 12:24:27 PM

WOWW,,,WOWWOWW :D :D :D Gboy, the one you are holding is another TREASURE by ITSELF.... could you be kind enough to share me a copy just for POSTERITY sake ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 02:58:41 PM
 GBOY,

There might be a secret passage to it, even though it might not still be easy but it might be possible............Even for some small "bonus" deposit somewhere ;) ;) ;)

Take a hint on one of IJA's Principles of  Construction ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Gboy on March 27, 2013, 04:16:20 PM

In 1988,  a staff of Japan consul photocopied several maps from the vault of Japan Consulate in Davao and was given to my friend. My friend never attempted to operate these sites bcoz he knows that these maps are big vol sites and expensive to operate. Nevertheless, I was able to get some copies for our own extensive TH files and perusal.

I know that this particular map is unique among other Japs maps bcoz it give us lots of information or idea about buried big vol sites. This is where I got an idea of "of alleged vanishing treasure vault". I interview lots of treasure hunter and some of them had told us that they already found a concrete vault, but after overnight, the following morning the concrete vault was gone and what remain was a small collapse portion of dig site...where the concrete vault go ???  They even suspect of spirits or enkantos took their concrete vault.

By observing this particular map tunnel design....a hard cement vault was intentionally put on top of an empty space or square deep well. parang nakapatong sa butas . A slight nudge of the vault or soil erosion on the side of the cement vault, it will slide down into deep hole or empty second tunnel chamber. The rest are several level or stories of concrete vault, empty space, different colored sands, gravel, mud, rocks, water, etc.

Before the vanishing vault was the cause of enkantos or spirits with this unique tunnel design map, this could be the logical explanation of the alleged vanishing concrete vault.

YOU ARE CORRECT......THIS PARTICULAR UNIQUE TREASURE MAP IS INDEED A TREASURE TROVE OF INFORMATION IN ITSELF ABOUT DIGGINGS, TRAPS AND  TREASURE TUNNEL DESIGN


 
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 27, 2013, 05:13:01 PM
So now you've proven me right also about my previous postings with regards to a sliding design of a treasure vault. And yes, many attribute it to engkantos and the likes, causing misunderstandings within the group and causing dissolution.

Also, from somewhere in what you wrote, i know that somewhere here in my view of mountains fronting my end here is one big tunnel complex like the one you described....

Something that this mountains have this position of REVERSE SLOPE DEFENSE...

These Tunnel Complexes serves most for tunnel warfare and shelter with secondary purpose as big treasure depository sites...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: zeeker on March 27, 2013, 09:00:43 PM

In 1988,  a staff of Japan consul photocopied several maps from the vault of Japan Consulate in Davao and was given to my friend. My friend never attempted to operate these sites bcoz he knows that these maps are big vol sites and expensive to operate. Nevertheless, I was able to get some copies for our own extensive TH files and perusal.

I know that this particular map is unique among other Japs maps bcoz it give us lots of information or idea about buried big vol sites. This is where I got an idea of "of alleged vanishing treasure vault". I interview lots of treasure hunter and some of them had told us that they already found a concrete vault, but after overnight, the following morning the concrete vault was gone and what remain was a small collapse portion of dig site...where the concrete vault go ???  They even suspect of spirits or enkantos took their concrete vault.

By observing this particular map tunnel design....a hard cement vault was intentionally put on top of an empty space or square deep well. parang nakapatong sa butas . A slight nudge of the vault or soil erosion on the side of the cement vault, it will slide down into deep hole or empty second tunnel chamber. The rest are several level or stories of concrete vault, empty space, different colored sands, gravel, mud, rocks, water, etc.

Before the vanishing vault was the cause of enkantos or spirits with this unique tunnel design map, this could be the logical explanation of the alleged vanishing concrete vault.

YOU ARE CORRECT......THIS PARTICULAR UNIQUE TREASURE MAP IS INDEED A TREASURE TROVE OF INFORMATION IN ITSELF ABOUT DIGGINGS, TRAPS AND  TREASURE TUNNEL DESIGN


after hearing similar stories from fellow THs about a vault vanishing, i also entertained the idea that the japs must have built a system that will enable the vault to slide into other location when something is triggered or disturbed. now sir Gboy, a veteran TH, confirms it.

and yes they all believed that engkantos/guardians are the culprit :(
and blaming one or the other bec somebody in the group could have offended the engkanto/guardian hahaha
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: renantiur on March 28, 2013, 05:54:47 AM
im sorry for the 1st post. pls remove the post immediately preceeding this post.

FROM GBOY

This is where I got an idea of "of alleged vanishing treasure vault". I interview lots of treasure hunter and some of them had told us that they already found a concrete vault, but after overnight, the following morning the concrete vault was gone and what remain was a small collapse portion of dig site...where the concrete vault go ???  They even suspect of spirits or enkantos took their concrete vault.




                not only did i hear it from others, i actually encountered 2 sliding concrete vaults in davao city

                  1. 1st vault actually moved or slided into another location after 3 days of pounding it with a drilling machine.   after the 3rd day with incessant and constant pounding, the vault just vanished the next morning. all we saw was a hole and a 5-7 feet void. we measured it based on our metal cable attached to the drilling bit.   we only made a small hole, equivalent to almost 1.5 feet diameter , enough or the drill bit to pass the hole and do the pounding.

                 2. learning from the 1st experience, this time, we made a hole enough for 6 persons to go down and stand on the hole.  i estimated it at 2 meters. since i really want to make sure that i should see it before my 2 eyes if ever the concrete vault should vanish, i made that hole so big enough for me to see it at 45feet-48 feet from above all the way down (with proper lightings of course).   

                 after 2-3 weeks of making a hole with the modified big drilling machine, we were able to make that 2 meters diameter hole. at 45 feet, we were able to encounter again another concrete vault. what was amazing were the following:

                                  a. the concrete cement vault was positioned at almost 45 degrees (not 45%- but the inclination was leaning towards that direction.

                                  b. the concrete vault moved slowly (positioned at almost 45%) if there are two persons who will stand there at the same side and opposite to the inclination, similar to the one i saw at national treasure part 2 where the vault moved  .   i concluded that the cement vault was really positioned in an unstable manner, so that any weight opposite to the inclination, or any force that pounds the vault disturbing the current stable position  or any digging that will remove the earth from the portion that holds the concrete vault from sliding,   it is designed to slide from one chamber to another.  i think GBoy is right that one of the portion has a big hole, a hole where the cement vault will slide.  the position is like this

                                               "   \    "


sadly, we were not able to break open the 2nd vault (positioned at 45degrees) since the owner just ordered us to leave for so many reasons , legal means and/or foul, after seeing the concrete vault.  i could say, greed got us booted from the said place.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 01:39:31 PM

That's okay once in a while Zeeker, as this comes out due to the discussion of maps ( a collateral discussion that is) at least we are talking and sharing very sensible thoughts...

But well, if the moderator decides to create a special thread for that matter, be it titled--In Depth Analysis of a Golden Lily Map and i respectfully nominate Gboy to be the Author and or teacher...i have nominated and who will second the motion?, hep hep hurray..We are calling Gboy please.... my high respects.

Well, i have emphasized here to post samples of Gaihozu maps of Imperial Japanese Army in chronological order from the very earliest to the pre and world war two era,

But in order to continue the momentum, i'll offer everyone here a surprise....

That instead of featuring you some sample Gaihozu Maps from other Asean/ Pacific nations the Japanese Imperial Government colonized,

I'll post this map instead.... the Imperial Japanese Army's Gaihozu Map of the Philippines.

This for the sake and spirit of sharing...

I enjoin any member who has the ability to interpret Japanese writings that dominate the Map...please contribute your interpretations.----I will not post it until anyone swears here to truthfully volunteer to interpret the Jap writings.

No, i am not claiming that this is a treasure map but this is more maybe of a Topographical Map of the Philippines as rendered by the IJA's secret survey squads.

Some claims that TSEATC is getting boring...., now Gboy friend help me help revolutionize more our beloved forum. I'll post the GaihoZu of Philippines and you handle my other suggestion.
(of course this is only a suggestion and i respect your decision to decline)

Again to review:

Gaihozu:
 Are the maps of areas outside Japanese territories mostly general topographic ma
ps.
Gaihozu. Also referred to variously in the past as imperial maps, colonial surveys, or captured military maps
___________________________________________________________________________

Re: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 11:16:53 PM »

Sorry, I decline bcoz I am not an expert on map or G.L. map. I am just like anybody else curious and ignorant about Japs treasure map.  ;)

________________________________________________

No worries Gboy, but please continue contributing as we go along the thread, even how few your paragraphs are but every words of it are "nakakayanig", earthquake and or earth moving :o :o :o, really, please keep it up.....
_____________________________________________________

To the mods, thanks for readily providing supposedly new windows for the said new topics but as our friend Gboy politely declines, no probs, lets just continue our topics here, and no takers yet for the translations???,,,nevermind, i'll post one for now,,,so.....enjoy :) :) ;) ;)

But please anyone who knows to translate please post back with complete translations okay??


Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 02:49:35 PM
ohhh i have been fixing the map but its just too big to attach...

for the meantime please make do with this....still part of the Philippines maybe somewhere Visayas..just not sure

So if there's one who can translate please contribute, we might just find something that we can connect to Philippine T> Hunting.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 02:54:07 PM
ohhh i have been fixing the map but its just too big to attach...

for the meantime please make do with this....still part of the Philippines maybe somewhere Visayas..just not sure

So if there's one who can translate please contribute, we might just find something that we can connect to Philippine T> Hunting.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 03:01:06 PM
Circa 1942
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 05:28:50 PM

much bigger views, chopped in 3 parts
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on March 29, 2013, 05:30:08 PM
much bigger view
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 10, 2013, 01:51:35 PM

Still no contributed translations? :-\ :-\ ::) ::)


Well, I have been always ready to contribute more, such as maps but since this is a one way highway, its better to stop this..

Few days from now, i'll be back to where my heart belongs--be hitting country roads again and will be there most of my time, i selected to be with the natives, indigenous people, and will be teaching secondary level students for good.. Educator by weekdays, a hunter by weekends ;) ;) ;) ;)

Fresh air again, be with nature again.. Stay safe everyone and be brave!---destiny favors the thinking braves :D :D
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Janner on April 10, 2013, 02:43:39 PM
the problem is, the maps are so out of focus and blurred, its impossible to read any of the writing.
so, translating is out I'm afraid..... ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 14, 2013, 09:26:04 AM
This is part of Topo map Gaihuzu of Mindanao gensan-davao-bukidnon...
Interpretations would allow us to know whether there are some things we can connect to T. hunting though this is not a T. map but for sure this was done somewhere 1942-1944..
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 14, 2013, 09:48:58 AM
This from gaihuzo gensan-davao provinces-bukidnon topo map.
interpretations to the first cut -out, will prod me to post other cut-outs.

Or better,


pm me if someone who knows, so that we avoid posting all here, to the delight of arm-chair hunters who doesn't want to spend a sweat researching and instead just go to forums and fish informations without even caring to share something worthwhile from them.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 15, 2013, 09:02:20 AM
 another descriptions and last.

I already found a translator  a kin and a Japanese descendant somewhere in Calinan ( a kin and a nikkei-jin)
I'll try to figure out what info in context to T hunting i can derive from those ww2 Imperial Japs army Topo maps.

Informations are just somewhere out there, like, there where boxed diagrams with drawings of a plane, it seems to me in a mountaintops? ::) ::) ::). Knowing the locations of hangars, offices, headquarters, bunkers, previous mining areas and etc. could be another level :-* :-* :-*

One calling is nearing (last week of next month), i'll be in a Valley school. I might be gone here for long. Back to commune with nature, to the basics and far from technology.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 15, 2013, 09:14:24 AM


to give you an idea of some Gaihuzo and how old it is, here's one made by IJA for Hongkong...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 15, 2013, 09:22:58 AM

Gaihuzo of Burma
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 15, 2013, 09:32:26 AM

Gaihozu for Indonesia (sangihe)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 16, 2013, 07:39:01 PM
Gaihozu for Indonesia;  Most maps were prepared by IJA Chief of Staffs Southern Army General Headquarters                                        Period: 1943-1944

A1 Islands
Damar                       
Talaud
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 16, 2013, 07:44:14 PM
Gaihozu for
Indonesia
 
Bali

Timor
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 22, 2013, 12:23:57 AM
IJA mapping asia pacific...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on April 22, 2013, 12:30:40 AM
IJA mapping...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 16, 2013, 12:22:49 AM


One among the earliest Filipino tribesmen who witnessed foreign Survey Teams Pre-world war two.
During the war, Imperial Japanese Government troops became somehow familiar with Philippines' terrain because of those advance parties that masqueraded as planters and or businessmen to give the IJA & IJN the very much needed intelligence support.

Hi-tech surveyor during those times? ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 09:59:33 AM
IJA MAP
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 10:03:14 AM
IJA MAP
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 10:57:33 AM
Now here's something for those TSEATC forumers in the Visayas. an IJA rendition of Visayas Region map (GAIHUZO Visayas), study this map you might gather some additional insights that can aid you in your quests.
First, be acquainted with the Visayas Map in English and make it as your reference when you look on the Gaihuzo version.



Below, 1. Visayas Map rendered as reference
            2. Visayas region Gaihuzo Map
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 11:05:51 AM
LARGER VERSION
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 11:07:25 AM
2
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on May 17, 2013, 11:10:38 AM
3
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 05, 2013, 04:30:09 PM
Hello folks, im here now in a valley national high school.My first  day of appointment as  a mentor to most Kaolo students.This is a  test post viamy phone. Looking forward  for some exciting TH leads soon. Now finally, i will have  a   pay while  at same  time  pursuing  our  passion.  From  d mountaimountains n hills of Wadab Occidental, BV, connecting to u.  dis  a   test
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: zeeker on June 05, 2013, 05:01:04 PM
Hello folks, im here now in a valley national high school.My first  day of appointment as  a mentor to most Kaolo students.This is a  test post viamy phone. Looking forward  for some exciting TH leads soon. Now finally, i will have  a   pay while  at same  time  pursuing  our  passion.  From  d mountaimountains n hills of Wadab Occidental, BV, connecting to u.  dis  a   test

nice to know you are enjoying both sir Ben.
your test is A okay  :)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: kaloy on August 17, 2013, 10:05:04 PM
hypothetical scenario:
the benchmark is found on top of the hill. a cement slab. (the hill is surrounded by ricefields)... from this point, several arrows are pointing to different treasure sites. were the angles predetermined before they buried the treasures or the other way around?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Yojuyo on August 18, 2013, 12:18:18 AM
Hello folks, im here now in a valley national high school.My first  day of appointment as  a mentor to most Kaolo students.This is a  test post viamy phone. Looking forward  for some exciting TH leads soon. Now finally, i will have  a   pay while  at same  time  pursuing  our  passion.  From  d mountaimountains n hills of Wadab Occidental, BV, connecting to u.  dis  a   test


Wow... Good luck and Godbless Sire.....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: joe on August 20, 2013, 10:46:51 AM

much bigger views, chopped in 3 parts
ph2 map is @ southern leyte , the dinagat island and surigao or northern parts of Mindanao.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 13, 2015, 10:00:13 PM
Hello,
it's lonely here,no movements?,,,,... ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on June 14, 2015, 02:59:01 AM
Hello,
it's lonely here,no movements?,,,,... ::) ::) ::)

Hey Ben,

Congratulations! Nice to hear that you can pursue your passion and still earn income while doing it. Please keep us posted.
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hu
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 10:37:07 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO

Hello everybody, i did visited this website from time to time but just got no lengthy time to spend writing like i used to do here before.
I can't resist writing and connecting to you folks once again since, i know, i'm still not that perfect hunter after all and wanted more insightful ideas from the experts here.
After applying all due analysis and applying the principles of Geodesy, like finding the right monuments, survey grids, survey lines or in treasure hunting context, the markers, treasure grids and treasure lines. From a landmark and markers, i applied, tried and given starting bearing which of course served as my starting points of measurements. From that selected bearing value using only that old but reliable military compass, i also did assigned value or number of steps to try to find shallow sub surface markers then i relied on that found underground marker on which way to proceed. And that's only a quick recap on what happened on our site. Applied Geodetic Engineering precepts and this we found;
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 10:44:55 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 10:48:30 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 10:53:00 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 11:02:10 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 11:13:45 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 11:23:50 AM
CONNECTING THE DOTS NOW, ON OUR SITE SOMEWHERE AT THE FOOTHILLS OF MOUNT APO

And to my shock!!! a GRAVESTONE OR LAPIDA UNDER 50 FEET, 4x4 and markings on the lapida are embossed....
But however, i decided not to post the original photos here....i'll just give you the sketched copy....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 11:35:56 AM
Again, in the beginning of this thread i said this;

I would like to quote a friend by saying this, "A Geodetic Engineer is the man given his geodetic experience to unravel , if he only had the start points and scale” ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 11:57:26 AM
now any ideas please???,,

 i have my interpretations, but they say two heads is better than one, hence i enjoin the great minds here on their insightful ideas...what does this mean to you?....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 14, 2015, 10:08:57 PM
next will be the sketch of the dig, presently we are at 105 feet were we found 5 old culverts lined horizontally. We reached this far by following points and scale found and given by markers on both on the surface and sub-surface...Most of the trail we followed were backfilled with fine sand.,It's quite refreshing to note that finally, i can follow leads using the principles of Geodesy...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on June 14, 2015, 11:33:09 PM
Wow.. nice! Is that brass item with the holes in it a Japanese flute?

105 feet already? I hope you didn't miss the item. Hope ZOBEX will also assist you here.

Good luck!
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 15, 2015, 05:53:54 AM
I haven't finished yet my sketch yet Admin Tony but i assure you that will be amazing...however i have this diagram lifted from the" Yamashita Dreambook" by Aquila Chrysaeastos, not actually an exact representation but the placement of trap and the booty is somehere and somehow like this.....

The loot is laying on top of tons of fine sand, securely locked in place and in position until it will be disturbed, once disturbed and water mixes with the sand, it will be like quicksand, the loot will slid past under and into another chamber, and look, i believe we are now already on that chamber. We believed we avoided the dangers when we first diverted our dig when we found that "gravestone or tombstone or lapida".
We have some markers at 50 feet that told us to change direction, a duck marker that points somewhere and we followed that and after some point we found another duck marker and another direction. At almost every point we hauled backfilled sand, then at some point again we found a pyramid shaped hole, the center of which led us straight down, but again followed lots of backfilled sand, at some point, a compass was used, remembering and using a value for a bearing again, this time its reverse, and i noticed that eventhough we've drifted already some feet away from the main hole's sinking which started when we found that Lapida, we noticed that we're going back again to same level as that of the Lapida, after we found that culverts lined horizontally which seemed to me the entrance to chamber, the chamber that would catch the booty if it was touched and applied brute force..
That culvert's is now where we are, and mind you there's a door, and our next attack probably is, we will try to knock on heaven's door ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on June 15, 2015, 05:59:40 AM
Be back again next weekend folks, life is wonderful ;) ;) ;) ;) :-* :-* :-*
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on June 15, 2015, 05:39:22 PM
Dang it Ben, you sure are doing it the hard way.  It would be easier just to use an original map like this one ( small cut out ).  There is a couple of large rocks over a cement cased bunker door and a Japanese naval torpedo behind the bunker door.  About 20 feet long and 3,000 pounds .  Oh joy of joy who gets to de-arm the fuse .  Wish me luck, I will need it !

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: caped on June 16, 2015, 06:18:57 AM
wow. this is so exciting. hope everuthing turns out great. sir zobex, is that map a generic one for most hillside deposits? is the yellow arrow pointing to a trap? sir ben maybe after you recover can we see this site just to get an idea what we are up against.

in panabo there is a site that was discovered by accident. i havent seen it as the owner is paranoid. while digging a septic tank, the bottom collapsed n the digger got stuck in the bottom for 3 hours til the wife came to check on him. a rope was lowered for him to climb out. after some investigating the next day, they found a door. when they tried to open it just a little bit, it seemed to trigger a machine to run. the noise produced sounded like a generator and a big fan or blower. that was the last i heard bout that farmer. now does this sound legit? aside from ben, anyone else come across a door?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Yojuyo on June 20, 2015, 09:22:51 PM
now any ideas please???,,

 i have my interpretations, but they say two heads is better than one, hence i enjoin the great minds here on their insightful ideas...what does this mean to you?....

Horn
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 02:01:43 PM

Hello i'm back folks,

Well, thank you very much Zobex for your insight and that little cut from your map. Yes, it could have eased some of our hardwork if we do have a map but since it's not the case, I just tried the conventions of Geodetic measurements.
Remembering always the assumed basic start scale, angles ( forward and backwards bearings etc.) we do reach the indicated paths in the shown diagrams.
I believe your cut-out map Zobex is that on a hillside bunker right?, ours is directly underground. We came back and resumed our work these past few days and we, yes, admittedly, really hesitated after reading your cut-out map regarding that of a big naval torpedo at the culvert's entrance but after dowsing, thorough and careful examination we knew that there was no bomb at the entrance so we go ahead and cleared up all the backfilled sand in the culvert (5 culvert 4feet in diameter fittted together to form like a tunnel) until we reached the door (see attached diagram)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 02:18:04 PM
we tried to chisel the supposed door, but since it's getting late, we partially chiseled it but not actually broken and penetrated it. (it's 5pm already during that time) we decided to continue the work the next day. We return the next morning but when we started going down our dig, we heard a loud crumbling sound under for about nearly a minute and followed by a clanging metal sound.... sounds like this----Blag, blag, blag, bog, bog, bog blag, blag...then...,, clang, cling, tsing,tsing, tsing, tsing cling, tsing......

Just what was that???? we looked at each other very anxiously....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 02:35:15 PM
we later checked it out later that day, and we discovered that the culvert tunnel was already filled with water at our neck's level, we tried to inspect the insides of the culvert but we cannot see clearly since the water is somewhat cloudy or muddy "lubog" but i still can fell in my feet that the culvert was still intact. We withdraw and got back to the surface and planned our next move...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 02:50:17 PM
after the crumbling and the clanging, water is at our necks level infront of the culverts entrance...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 02:51:32 PM
after the crumbling and the clanging, water is at our necks level infront of the culverts entrance...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 03:08:45 PM
second day after the banging and clanging sound.....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 03:20:07 PM
Now, presently our problem is the water which sets at approximately 60 feet, we will soon produce submersible pumps.
We planned to drain the water and see whats the situation now at the culvert tunnel and the believed collapsed door, and just what was that clanging, cling tsang, tsing tsing sound was??? ???

If you were to decide folks, which way should it best be penetrated?--go back to the culvert tunnel and check it or go at the 50 feet level whre the"lapida" or tombstone was found and dig down straight sinking??

suggestions please Zobex, any help? and the rest of the best hunters here i will welcome your thoughts....
Thank you in advance for any insightful ideas.....
Be back again next weekend....
BV2015
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 03:35:07 PM
Anyways here's some photos for your reference.
Some of the markers we found........
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 03:41:55 PM
Some of the markers we found........
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on July 05, 2015, 03:53:03 PM
Some of the markers we found........
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on July 06, 2015, 09:57:23 AM
Hello Ben and welcome back! It's always nice to see your project updates here!

The best of luck to you guys!
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on July 06, 2015, 12:25:00 PM
Just what was that???? we looked at each other very anxiously...

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

May I suggest steel fuel drums or worse bouncy antisubmarine depth charges.  Not being funny.  We personally have run into both of those.  You see, fuel drums of oil or gasoline will float.  In the tunnel in Zamboanga there was a pyramid of fuel drums with a depth charge on top set with two " pistons ".  We bypassed them, long, long story.  Found fuel drums on the stair case in the Bukidnon tunnel complex, they were daisy chained with a trip wire and one was, I was told by an expert, a magnetic trip depth charge.  We decided to completely bypass that tunnel annex.

Just saying, sounds like fuel drums in the chamber and as it floods the fuel drums are rising and either hitting the sides or ceiling of the tunnel complex.  As you were digging you let off the air lock on the complex, it can breath so now it will flood.  We have had that too.  A tunnel is good for not more than 6 weeks when you open one.  It starts to fall apart after that.

If I was digging, that would be my interpretation.  But again I make mistakes to.

I have also found similar funny or odd shaped cement like objects in a 100% vault complex.  Were found with 22 remains of IJA all laying out in rows like on military formation.

The problem with flat land deposits or vaults is, they generally are deep, there is flooding problems and pumping out water on flat land is a pain in the butt.

I'm rooting for you there Ben.

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on July 06, 2015, 12:29:32 PM
Pump water so you can see what you have.  Make sure it is actually man made.  Once inside an IJA complex there is no more decoy fake walls ( well almost and yes we found a couple of exceptions ).

Pump water, take measurements and lots of good photographs.  I invested in a couple of good digital cameras.  In the long run they are worth every peso I paid for them.

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on July 06, 2015, 12:34:07 PM
Forgot to point it out exactly.  YES we have had floating fuel drums in a flooded hard rock tunnel.  They sounded exactly like that and we also wondered then realized it was the steel drums of fuel setting on the stair case we abandon.  That tunnel developed cracks in it, it was beside a river and eventually the roof let go and the river broke in.  That tunnel had 4 trucks inside and a railroad to a steel vault door we never got the chance to cut open.  5 years of wasted life.  1998-2003.

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: zeeker on July 08, 2015, 10:13:17 PM
what if wait for the water to get clear, then have a scuba diver assess the tunnel situation?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: fom1113 on July 14, 2015, 06:19:22 PM
  You got plenty of signs. Your site is 100% positive. The missing one in your operation is my pinpointing. The tombstone is about 10 meters away from the first target. The scanning device's pinpoint spot is also several meters away from that first target. The depth is in between 10 to 15 meters.

I'm willing to help provided you agree to my demand of 7% share including transpo and meal allowance.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on July 15, 2015, 10:29:02 AM
what if wait for the water to get clear, then have a scuba diver assess the tunnel situation?

I tried that as well.  Thought it would be a quick solution, but the problem is this.  A flooded tunnel will be full of soft silt or mud and as soon as someone starts to kick up the water by moving in it, turns into a murky cloudy mess that even with portable lights you are lucky to see 1 meter in front of yourself.  It's is not like swimming in a sea cave where the tunnel has been constantly flushed clean by lots of moving water.  It's also creepy.  Don't be claustrophobic. 

Z

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on October 17, 2015, 06:13:45 PM
JOURNEY TOTHE CENTER OF THE PHILIPPINES

A writer revisits the datum origin of all surveying and mapping activities in the country
MOGPOG, Marinduque – In 1911, the American surveyors left a stone marker at the peak of the “Mataas na Bundok” in the northwestern portion of Marinduque island. It was tagged as the datum origin of all surveying and mapping activities in the Philippines.
Yet, can we consider Station Balanacan, which is popularly known as the “Luzon Datum” the center of the Philippines as it was perceived through the years?

“Not really, but the issue is now irrelevant,” said Deputy Administrator Jose Cabanayan Jr. of the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA).
Cabanayan noted that Station Balanacan remains the country’s datum origin – or the county’s reference system, even with the emergence of a world geodetic system. The Luzon Datum remains the “center of all centers” if a network of interlocking triangles were used to determine positions.

Historical significance
In 2011, the National Historical Commission unveiled a historical marker of the “Datum Origin of the Luzon Datum of 1911” in recognition of its significant role in the history of the Philippine surveying and mapping.
According to NAMRIA documents, Balanacan as a geodetic origin began as early as 1901 when the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS) conducted a series of scientific and cartographic initiatives in its newfound colony in 1901.
Initially, there were 39 other stations, but the USCGS adopted the Station Balanacan as the“mother of all survey monuments (or ‘mojon’).”
All surveys from 1901 to 1927 were then corrected and based on the position of the Station Balanacan (Latitude 13 33’ 41”.00 North, Longitude 121 52’ 03.000 East) .
A geodetic station was said to be in the Luzon Datum if it is connected by continuous triangulation from Station Balanacan.
The formed triangulation network then spanned vast distances with stations that were located on high mountain peaks and far across straits and channels.
In 1946, when the country was granted independence, the USCGS developed the Philippine Geodetic Network (PGN), which consisted of a narrow chain of triangular stations concentrated along the coastal areas for triangulation and hydrographic surveys,
The Philippine Bureau of Coast and Geodetic Survey (BCGS) then assumed the establishment of geodetic control points.
By 1987, the BCGS was merged with four other agencies under the NAMRIA, which upgraded the PGN into the Philippine Reference System of 1992, or PRS92 — the standard reference system of all surveys and mapping activities global network of geodetic control points (GCPs) marked by survey monuments established by using the Global Positioning System.

Entry of the world geodetic system
According to Deputy Administrator Cabanayan, Station Balanacan remained the datum origin when the PRS92 was merged under global standards with the world geodetic system.
Commander Ronaldo Gatchalian, who heads NAMRIA’s geodesy division, said that based on the “old practice” there was no need to change the reference system.
But in using the global reference system in mapping and surveying, the physical origin is now the center of the Philippine
 
Preserving the Luzon Datum
In 2007, a NAMRIA team went to Marinduque to conduct a reconnaissance survey of Station Balanacan which had turned into a cogon field. They found the station and the marker on a hard rock still intact.
It was also the year when the PRS92 Project was implemented to complete the national geodetic network, which was tasked to integrate all old surveys and maps “into the new network for sustainable management and development of the country’s natural resources.”
It was also aimed at setting up more accurate spatial positioning for infrastructure and other activities.
Commander Gatchalian said they consider the PRS92 as “modified Luzon Datum,’ with the Station Balanacan as its datum origin, but with correction on its coordinates.
In August 2011, a centennial national historical marker mounted on a marble pedestal for the station was unveiled in recognition of the geodetic station’s role in the history of the country’s mapping and surveying.
Narra and other indigenous trees were also planted around the 28-hectares covering the Station Balanacan to promote ecotourism in the island province.
The ecotourism center was also envisioned to honor the forebear surveyors and mapmakers in the country.
After all, this was where it all began.

By Joel Paredes
Joel briefly served government as director-general of the Philippine Information Agency (PIA), although he has been a practicing journalist and writer for nearly 37 years. He led a team organized by the University of the Philippines Los Banos (UPLB)  and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) that worked on the book entitled “Protecting our Natural Wealth, Enhancing our Natural Pride.”
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on October 17, 2015, 06:35:15 PM
Mga ka bro in Treasure Hunting----wag basta sirain, bunutin lahat ng mga batong makita na may markings at hole---baka kayo ay ma charge sa pag sira ng...............................................,,,,,,,,,
Datum of origin of all surveying and mapping in the Philippines
Kaya wag basta-bastang mag assume na everything odd you see in the field or site ay agad agad-------Treasure marks!!!!!,,,,but somehow, there might be a relation......kaya wag basta sisirain bagkus gawing platform for any related references.........BV..

My brothers in treasure hunting, don't destroy, pull out every stones with markings and holes that you see in the fields and sites are not all treasure realated, yet you be charge in destroying,,,,Datum of origin of all surveying and mapping in the Philippines,,,,,
don't always assume that everything you see is treasure related,,,,but somehow who knows, there might be a relation indeed, so therefore, don't destroy, instead, make it your flatform of references........ ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) :D :D :D ;) ;) ;) ;).....BV2015
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on October 18, 2015, 05:12:55 AM
Good advice, Ben.

Thanks for posting.

TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on October 25, 2015, 09:54:07 AM
It's engineering works,

Take this from the conversation of Prince Chichibu and Major Nakasone on planning one of treasure burials in historical landmarks in Manila

"Yes, I agree, Your Excellencies. Drawing these exact
locations on a scale map is not a problem. I like it. It would solve
a number of technical problems, but most of all, it would allow us
to keep our activities secret." Nakasone said rather excitedly.
"Is this going to be a problem in locating our spur tunnel so
that it ends up directly under the structure; let's say under an alter
of a church for example?" Prince Chichibu asked addressing his
question to the Major.
"Not at all Your Excellency. With the use of a transit we can
hit a mark within a matter of an inch or two. This type of
engineering is basic and has been known for the past 100 years.

Engineers use it when the dig a long railway tunnel, especially
when they start digging from both sides of a mountain. The ends
meet in the middle at exactly the same spot. That includes up and
down as well as side to side."
Nakasone answered, chosing to use
layman terms.
"You can measure the elevation that closely?" Chichibu
asked.
"Yes, Your Excellency, within an inch or two." The Major
replied.
"Okay! Excellent! I think you may have answered my next
question. When we were at Fort McKinley last week you showed
me General MacArthur's air raid shelter that was dug in the middle
of the circular driveway in front of his headquarters, which also
served as his officer's club. As I remember it there were two flights
of concrete steps that led down to three large rooms which were
about 60 feet from the surface. Is that about right?" Chichibu
asked.
"
------definitely engineering work, ;) ;) ;) ;) It has been long ago measured in precise scale and angles put into map so that it can be relocated. To locate is to relocate.....BV
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on October 25, 2015, 11:58:25 PM
Very nice. I love it.
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on January 04, 2017, 02:35:34 PM
Hello everyone, it's been a long absence realy, how are my old buddies and friends here???
As much as i wanted to have a good conclusion of this topic or thread, I just wanna post this, MAYBE, just maybe the finders shown in this video, just may have followed the basic principles of Geodetic Engineering....I wanted to have my own real recovery, but my situation and position won't allow me to do so...I have at least top 5 sites that i have to make action this 2017, Its now or never, after 2017, i'll say its quits....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on January 04, 2017, 03:04:05 PM

 MAYBE THE FINDERS MAY HAVE FOLLOWED THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GEODESY... :) ;) ;) ;) :D
 REMEMBER TO LOCATE IS TO RELOCATE....
 FOLLOWED A MAP PERHAPS....

 LOOK AT THE MARK ON THE VIDEO.."DUTERTE COMMUNITY"  ;D ;D ;D
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OXZdvRHa7Y
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Voyager on January 04, 2017, 06:24:21 PM
Welcome back sir Ben, I've read a lot of your articles, they're very educational. 

I hope the people who made the recovery will give a little background to help other THunters esp. on the dis arming of bombs and the challenges they encountered. One thing I noticed the items were not laced with poison.

Anyway, it's nice to know you're still at it! Hope you can give us your experiences on your last few projects. Good luck and may God bless you always!

Voyager
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on January 04, 2017, 07:50:30 PM
  You can also watch it here at my youtube channel

          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSwb4yIlqHvgCh5bBXLlYHg  ----My you tube channel, to view some of my adventures        way back then......
           
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaZYuM6qQu4
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on January 05, 2017, 04:57:54 AM
We checked and there is no National Museum permit issued that corresponds to this.  So this by his laws is an illegal exploration and recovery.  Further there is no record of a Central Bank notification or clearance on any of this, as of 12 hours ago.  So if not in advance then what ??

The site was started in November.  So where did it go to ??  To pay for hit squads and bribes ? ?


Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: jerzx on January 05, 2017, 06:08:18 PM
I saw the video clip from FB it seems that the recovery is real, the GB are huge probably more than 20kg each. . i hope somebody will post how they managed to recover it.  what are the steps and obstacle they encountered.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on January 05, 2017, 10:40:36 PM
Welcome back, Ben.

What's that DUTERTE COMMUNITY all about???
TW
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on January 13, 2017, 09:34:48 AM
Duterte Community, just one amongst the many Duterte group of supporters...
Well folks,saw this posted somewhere in the net, could this be the haul of the lucky group?
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Voyager on January 13, 2017, 10:06:03 AM
I think that's real. Now we can be assured that we can go THunting without interference from local police or officials. Thanks to Duterte, he made it possible!
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on January 13, 2017, 11:00:26 AM


Not unlike if one is an arrogant, disrespectful and humbug foreign treasure hunter ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on January 15, 2017, 05:25:06 AM
Hmmm... not sure if I'm a fan of the below comment..  :-\

1) That treasure buried throughout the Philippines mainly belongs to other Southeast Asian countries.. not to the Filipinos.. in the first place.

2) How would the Filipino people like it if suddenly Mr. Trump... said "No Filipinos are allowed to do any treasure hunting, metal detecting, etc. throughout the entire USA???" Personally, I, myself would be offended and I'm not even a Filipino. It would be very BIASED for him to say or hint something like that. Almost as bad what he said about 'Not allowing anymore Muslims into the USA for now.' That's just plain WRONG.

TW


Not unlike if one is an arrogant, disrespectful and humbug foreign treasure hunter ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: renantiur on January 17, 2017, 11:40:36 AM
i think the comment of ben valmores is referring to one particular person who may fit that discription, and not to all foreign treasure hunters.. if the foreign treasure hunter is a disrespectful one, that comment refers to him. the same with disrespectful filipinos.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on January 18, 2017, 12:26:00 AM
Yes, Renatiur, you are correct about who Ben was referring to. I also wasn't directing my comment at Ben.. from what I have heard.. your new President is Anti-American because the USA was giving him some shit about his so-called 'Hit Squad' tactics executing suspected drug users/dealers/etc. So, now, because of him.. my prospective shipwreck project investors are completely turned off and don't want to have anything to do with pursuing shipwrecks in the Philippines. Sucks!
TW

i think the comment of ben valmores is referring to one particular person who may fit that discription, and not to all foreign treasure hunters.. if the foreign treasure hunter is a disrespectful one, that comment refers to him. the same with disrespectful filipinos.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Yojuyo on January 20, 2017, 03:45:54 AM
my prospective shipwreck project investors are completely turned off and don't want to have anything to do with pursuing shipwrecks in the Philippines. Sucks!
TW



Maybe its to create a new crew sir.
Im sure many here loves to explore our sea bed.  Specially with an additional purpose like we do. 8) ;D

Y
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: ZOBEX on January 21, 2017, 07:03:16 PM
my prospective shipwreck project investors are completely turned off and don't want to have anything to do with pursuing shipwrecks in the Philippines. Sucks!
TW



Maybe its to create a new crew sir.
Im sure many here loves to explore our sea bed.  Specially with an additional purpose like we do. 8) ;D

Y

Well TW, perhaps they don't want to be framed up by crooked PNP of the new president.  Besides the Korean, there is the just recent frame up at NAIA.  I remember when the crooked NAIA murdered a ethnic Filipino American Citizen a Lt. Commander in the USN.  First framed him on phony drug charge and when the US Embassy came over, they tossed him off of a set of cement stairs and broke his neck.  If you like I can post his picture and a picture of the cement steps he was tossed off of.

Let's see, it was crooked cops from the new presidential anti drug task force from Camp Crame that raided the innocent man's home with a fake search warrant for non existent firearms.  Then kidnapped him and shoved him in a van and told his wife they found drugs in his house, no fire arms.  Then took him to Camp Crame the PNP HQ.  While at Camp Crame and inside Camp Crame wrapped his head up with duct tame to suffocate him, while still in handcuffs to kill him off.  Now mind you the place he as assassinated at is only 40 meters across the floor from the office of the New Director of national police, the presidents right hand goon from Davao City.  Hmmmm.  Now the murdered man with his head wrapped in duct tape is removed from Camp Crame again about 40 meters from the Directors office and taken to a crematorium owned by an alleged that is, former member of the Anti Drug Task Force.  Now why would an asset and field agent for the Anti Drug Task Force need a funeral parlor and crematorium to incinerate bodies.  Well after paying a large cash bribe for the now dead husband, the wife demands to see proof of life before paying more.  No proof, he is already burned up, so she contacts the NBI.  Hmmmm.  Some how the owner of the crematorium gets tipped off by Camp Crame and he flushes the ashes down the toilet and immediately runs to NAIA and takes a flight to CANADA, getting out of the country just before the NBI try to grab him.  Naturally there is more but - - - - -.

I am very familiar with the top floor of Camp Crame, while other Filipinos were out grubbing on the street, back 10-15 years ago I had a Nation Wide Security Agency license issued out of Camp Crame and spent about 3 days a week going to the top floor of the building.  I know the exact layout of the offices and rooms.  Can also tell you it must be very embarrassing for the top of the administration to keep a house boy in a white jacket busy with buckets of water flushing the toilets because back then there was no working plumbing even at the top floor.  We always wondered about that.  Yes I had that license, it was controversial to be said.

So I kind of doubt there will be a lot of investors lining up to gamble on getting anything there.





So TW I kind of doubt you will get any foreign investors to put money in the PH.

Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 18, 2017, 08:03:38 AM
More proofs of Filipinos who recovers....Chavit Singson
http://www.tulfonews.com/#video/507
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: admin on February 18, 2017, 09:54:40 AM
Unfortunately, they speaking in Japanese. Did he actually say that's from recovered WWII treasure? Where those other bars Silver or Platinum?
TW

More proofs of Filipinos who recovers....Chavit Singson
http://www.tulfonews.com/#video/507
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 18, 2017, 11:15:09 AM
Chavit Singson, a long-time Governor in Ilocos sur, one of his real state sits a yellow submarine named "the treasure hunter"....
self-explanatory....
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: caped on February 19, 2017, 05:54:01 PM
There were rumours spreading that putin was in davao just a few days ago. We all know how gossip spreads here in the philippines. Anyone know if this is true.
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 19, 2017, 06:12:33 PM
More proofs of Filipinos who recovers....Chavit Singson
http://www.tulfonews.com/#video/507
Better view at my channel in you tube,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKIfuK9K9oE
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ben Valmores on February 19, 2017, 06:16:25 PM
There were rumours spreading that putin was in davao just a few days ago. We all know how gossip spreads here in the philippines. Anyone know if this is true.

as of my end here, there's that's negative Caped...
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: Ruby on February 19, 2017, 06:49:02 PM
Russian yes, Putin...no...

Duterte said Russia made the offer during the visit of Nikolai Patrushev, the secretary of Russia’s Security Council and Vladimir Putin’s top security adviser to Duterte in Davao City on February 16.

http://annx.asianews.network/content/russian-security-experts-train-select-filipino-police-soldiers-39503
Title: Re: Imperial Japanese Geodetic Survey, Mapmaking,Maps: In context to Ph. T. Hunting
Post by: caped on February 19, 2017, 07:24:33 PM
So strange how these stories come up. Heard this from 3 different sources who arent connected. They said there was a media blackout obviously. Lol.