Author Topic: Sterling Seagrave  (Read 232 times)

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Offline ZOBEX

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Sterling Seagrave
« on: September 27, 2017, 08:00:21 AM »
Just to share with the members of the forum, I just learned today since it was never really made public.  Sterling Seagrave passed away May 1 ,  2017 .  He was an extraordinary investigator and in his later years, as I understand from him, he had been threatened not to continue any reporting or writing on Japanese war treasure and related matters.  It was from Sterling that I first was faced with the possibility that Yamashita did not surrender but rather it was a stand in that surrendered to American forces.  His retreat to the mountains was to secure business there and facilitate the switch.  I asked him why and he said it first came to light in that the early and late pictures of him did not match.  True.  His execution was never documented.  True.  The one responsible for most of the treasure deposits was Tanaka who was re-leaved as governor of the Philippines in 1944 but did not leave till about October 1944, returning to Tokyo purportedly for medical reasons.  With Tanaka having the majority of the burial responsibilities, he would have the documentation on the sites.  Yamashita only operated on Luzon and then while under attack by American forces.  IF Yamashita did in fact get out of the Philippines alive and was replaced by a body double, then the two men responsible for the bulk of the treasure sites and having full knowledge of all that was done, the two of them made it out safe to Japan.  It is known that in the last days before Yamashita walked down the mountain to surrender, he sent a special aircraft out of the country with  massive database of the treasure sites and inventories.  The question would be, was he secretly on the same aircraft with all the documentation ? ?

Z




Offline Voyager

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2017, 07:02:09 PM »
About Seagrave, I think the burning question now is, where is the soft copies of the maps that he burned?  Of the 175 sites, how many were left? Those sites are not easy to operate but what the heck! Who knows?  I heard one group from another forum who took over the site of Marcos when his men left empty-handed.  This group dug and dug for several years at the area and hit jackpot just a few months ago.  With China about to dominate world's business, maybe it's time we do something about this potential wealth.

Voyager

Offline Voyager

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2017, 07:32:34 PM »
The first thing that came to mind when I saw the Yamashita who surrendered was that he was not the same guy known as the Tiger of Malaya.  The pictures are clearly different.  There was no DNA testing then. The guy who surrendered seemed wiser and philosophical and had really fought with his them, judging from his answers.  A real hero material, I would say.  But if we consider the deaths that resulted from their acts, there was no hero among them. No winners, all losers, both sides. Both produced widows and fatherless...

Voyager

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2017, 08:38:56 PM »
ZOBEX: I emailed Sterling around May 15 and when he didn't reply back within a few weeks I started getting worried because he usually replies back within a day or two. So, then I managed to track down his daughter (who lives here in the USA) and that's when she informed me that he had passed away at the beginning of May. Sad to hear that. He was an awesome guy!

VOYAGER: Sterling never had copies of the maps. It was Bob Curtis who had those (photos) of the maps. Bob died around 2002 and his wife (Yolanda) had all the info. I lost contact with her and now I heard that she passed away a few years ago so I have no idea what happened to that info now.
TW

Offline Voyager

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2017, 09:43:49 PM »
Sorry guys. I was referring to Bob Curtis.
What a waste!   All those efforts and deaths washed down the drain of history!  One 999 site had about 50,000 tons? Drives me crazy!

Offline ZOBEX

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2017, 04:30:17 PM »
The first thing that came to mind when I saw the Yamashita who surrendered was that he was not the same guy known as the Tiger of Malaya.  The pictures are clearly different.  There was no DNA testing then. The guy who surrendered seemed wiser and philosophical and had really fought with his them, judging from his answers.  A real hero material, I would say.  But if we consider the deaths that resulted from their acts, there was no hero among them. No winners, all losers, both sides. Both produced widows and fatherless...

Voyager

Exactly.

I understand, from sources I am totally not permitted to disclose sorry, that after Tanaka arrived back in Tokyo in late 1944, he had a go at it with Yamashita about maps, documentation and the site closures.  There was a complete set of everything that was sent out in mid 1945.  But it - - - - - - .

Never say that it was all lost - - - - .  Some day once the governmental powers get re-aligned, who knows what will pop up - - - - .  Over 1,000,000 metric tons still are there.  Believe what you want or don't - - - - .


Z


Offline Voyager

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2017, 12:21:05 PM »
Yeah makes sense. I mean all they will go to war and all, then will just trust 2 guys to carry the maps? No way. Okay clear as a crystal.

The load is believable. Just praying that China will not invade us for that.  And then maybe someday I can come across a site big enough to excite us...

Offline Yojuyo

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Re: Sterling Seagrave
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2017, 11:46:39 PM »
Just to share with the members of the forum, I just learned today since it was never really made public.  Sterling Seagrave passed away May 1 ,  2017 .  He was an extraordinary investigator and in his later years, as I understand from him, he had been threatened not to continue any reporting or writing on Japanese war treasure and related matters.  It was from Sterling that I first was faced with the possibility that Yamashita did not surrender but rather it was a stand in that surrendered to American forces.  His retreat to the mountains was to secure business there and facilitate the switch.  I asked him why and he said it first came to light in that the early and late pictures of him did not match.  True.  His execution was never documented.  True.  The one responsible for most of the treasure deposits was Tanaka who was re-leaved as governor of the Philippines in 1944 but did not leave till about October 1944, returning to Tokyo purportedly for medical reasons.  With Tanaka having the majority of the burial responsibilities, he would have the documentation on the sites.  Yamashita only operated on Luzon and then while under attack by American forces.  IF Yamashita did in fact get out of the Philippines alive and was replaced by a body double, then the two men responsible for the bulk of the treasure sites and having full knowledge of all that was done, the two of them made it out safe to Japan.  It is known that in the last days before Yamashita walked down the mountain to surrender, he sent a special aircraft out of the country with  massive database of the treasure sites and inventories.  The question would be, was he secretly on the same aircraft with all the documentation ? ?

Z

Japs army choose to die than surrender.

" One FAILURE doens' t matter in the great scheme of life."